BitCoin and FuturePay – MIDI Drum Files

Tokenization and Crypto Taxation

Hi everyone, I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share with you our new episode regarding Tokenization and Crypto Taxation. I hope you find it interesting and informative, also if you have any topics you would like us to discuss in further episodes please let me know. Our purpose is to help individuals better understand the relationship between cryptocurrency and taxation.
Enjoy the episode
Episode Page
Audio Only
Our guest today is Andrew (Drew) Hinkes, an Attorney at Carlton Fields and Adjunct Professor at the NYU Stern Business School and the NYU School of Law. Last time Drew was on the podcast, back in June 2019, we discussed gaps in the current crypto tax guidance and what it was like to have the unique opportunity to teach a college course on cryptocurrency.
Drew updates us on what has changed in his world, and the world of crypto, since we last spoke. He shares how the coronavirus impacted his life as a professor, lawyer, and cryptocurrency advocate. In addition, Drew gives us a crash course on tokenization – providing our listeners with an analysis of the current landscape, and future of, tokenized assets.

Episode Highlights

Drew’s Background in Law and Tech (02:32)

Many lawyers don’t necessarily have a technical background. Law has not traditionally been the most technology progressive sort of industry. So I had a little bit of a head start over many of my peers because I know how to read some code. I understand databases and because I had experience working with technology, I had a little bit of a head start on wrapping my head around Bitcoin. I think it probably only took me about a year and a half to really get it.

The effects of Coronavirus on Tax Guidance (04:55)

It could be that the issuance of additional guidance is just not a priority right now. I have no independent insight what the IRS is or is not thinking or doing right now. I will say anecdotally, other agencies that are focused more on enforcement, like the SEC and the CFTC, have not stepped down their efforts because of the coronavirus. Again, we’re sort of reading tea leaves here, but it would not surprise me if we saw some of the same issues that plagued the IRS between 2014 and 2019 pop back up where showing additional guidance might be de-prioritized at least on a temporary basis.

The Coronavirus and Crypto (10:45)

From a sort of a macro standpoint, there has always been certain sort of non traditional communities that flocked to Bitcoin and to cryptocurrencies generally. Some of the earlier communities were very focused on alternative economic systems – seeing Bitcoin as something that can change the way the world works, separate money from the state and so forth. And there was a large community of people who are preppers thinking that governments were gonna fall and that economic systems, since they’ve gone off the gold standard in 1970 we’re destined for failure. And to a certain degree, these communities probably feel somewhat vindicated because we’d seen the overall fragility of our economy.

The Future of Crypto (24:35)

I think the coronavirus challenge has brought to the forefront some elements of how the economy works that we don’t usually really think about that much. Mostly folks in the finance world think about who’s really pulling the levers and how central governments control economies. We’ve seen the need to get cash out into people’s hands and how, at least in the United States, the federal reserve can produce as much money as is necessary in order to fund this. So in these new change conditions, there are new opportunities.
Again, I try not to give business or legal advice on a podcast, even this one Sal, but my suggestion would be for people to think about being flexible and to think about being adaptive. I don’t think a successful investor strategy right now looks at the economy the same way that they did a year ago. And so as people start to think outside of their comfort zones, and start to figure out ways to be nimble as conditions change. It’s entirely possible that folks will come around and understand that instruments like Bitcoin and some of the other alternatives arising out of the crypto world, might become new attractive options.

A Crash Course in Tokenization (26:42)

I guess the simplest way to think about tokenization…is the attempt to create a digital representation of a real life thing. Whether it’s property, whether it’s a right or some sort of asset. The concept behind tokenization is you can create a digital twin of the item and then take advantage of the powers and rights associated with tokenization versus the physical asset. For example, a token that represents a property right or a house. The argument goes if you tokenize that asset, you can take advantage of the speed of transaction, the liquidity associated with the assets. That sort of thing is the big picture idea.
If you like smart contracts, one of the appeals of the smart contract is that you can, using logic, automate or streamline transactions. But smart contracts, as we have learned, work best in the blockchain context when the assets at issue are digital. So if you can create a digital version of an external thing, the idea goes, you can make a bunch of new more efficient transactions related to that thing. That’s sort of the big picture idea. But of course there are some complications to this.

Complications of Tokenization (28:15)

Let’s take the house as an example. I have a token that represents my house and the idea is I can do a transaction of that token to another party and then the bearer, or the holder, or the party that controls the token can then control the house. Cool idea, but it sort of ignores all of the legal and regulatory infrastructure around a home.
If you want to actually replicate that transaction in a digital way, you have to either change the way the law works, or you have to have the law recognize this new system. To my knowledge, there are very few tokenized systems that actually are designed around and reflective of the law that impact the item that has been tokenized.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to bitcoinpodcast [link] [comments]

Tokenization and Crypto Taxation [PODCAST]

Hi everyone, I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share with you our new episode regarding Tokenization and Crypto Taxation. I hope you find it interesting and informative, also if you have any topics you would like us to discuss in further episodes please let me know. Our purpose is to help individuals better understand the relationship between cryptocurrency and taxation.
Enjoy the episode
Episode Page
Audio Only
Our guest today is Andrew (Drew) Hinkes, an Attorney at Carlton Fields and Adjunct Professor at the NYU Stern Business School and the NYU School of Law. Last time Drew was on the podcast, back in June 2019, we discussed gaps in the current crypto tax guidance and what it was like to have the unique opportunity to teach a college course on cryptocurrency.
Drew updates us on what has changed in his world, and the world of crypto, since we last spoke. He shares how the coronavirus impacted his life as a professor, lawyer, and cryptocurrency advocate. In addition, Drew gives us a crash course on tokenization – providing our listeners with an analysis of the current landscape, and future of, tokenized assets.

Episode Highlights

Drew’s Background in Law and Tech (02:32)

Many lawyers don’t necessarily have a technical background. Law has not traditionally been the most technology progressive sort of industry. So I had a little bit of a head start over many of my peers because I know how to read some code. I understand databases and because I had experience working with technology, I had a little bit of a head start on wrapping my head around Bitcoin. I think it probably only took me about a year and a half to really get it.

The effects of Coronavirus on Tax Guidance (04:55)

It could be that the issuance of additional guidance is just not a priority right now. I have no independent insight what the IRS is or is not thinking or doing right now. I will say anecdotally, other agencies that are focused more on enforcement, like the SEC and the CFTC, have not stepped down their efforts because of the coronavirus. Again, we’re sort of reading tea leaves here, but it would not surprise me if we saw some of the same issues that plagued the IRS between 2014 and 2019 pop back up where showing additional guidance might be de-prioritized at least on a temporary basis.

The Coronavirus and Crypto (10:45)

From a sort of a macro standpoint, there has always been certain sort of non traditional communities that flocked to Bitcoin and to cryptocurrencies generally. Some of the earlier communities were very focused on alternative economic systems – seeing Bitcoin as something that can change the way the world works, separate money from the state and so forth. And there was a large community of people who are preppers thinking that governments were gonna fall and that economic systems, since they’ve gone off the gold standard in 1970 we’re destined for failure. And to a certain degree, these communities probably feel somewhat vindicated because we’d seen the overall fragility of our economy.

The Future of Crypto (24:35)

I think the coronavirus challenge has brought to the forefront some elements of how the economy works that we don’t usually really think about that much. Mostly folks in the finance world think about who’s really pulling the levers and how central governments control economies. We’ve seen the need to get cash out into people’s hands and how, at least in the United States, the federal reserve can produce as much money as is necessary in order to fund this. So in these new change conditions, there are new opportunities.
Again, I try not to give business or legal advice on a podcast, even this one Sal, but my suggestion would be for people to think about being flexible and to think about being adaptive. I don’t think a successful investor strategy right now looks at the economy the same way that they did a year ago. And so as people start to think outside of their comfort zones, and start to figure out ways to be nimble as conditions change. It’s entirely possible that folks will come around and understand that instruments like Bitcoin and some of the other alternatives arising out of the crypto world, might become new attractive options.

A Crash Course in Tokenization (26:42)

I guess the simplest way to think about tokenization…is the attempt to create a digital representation of a real life thing. Whether it’s property, whether it’s a right or some sort of asset. The concept behind tokenization is you can create a digital twin of the item and then take advantage of the powers and rights associated with tokenization versus the physical asset. For example, a token that represents a property right or a house. The argument goes if you tokenize that asset, you can take advantage of the speed of transaction, the liquidity associated with the assets. That sort of thing is the big picture idea.
If you like smart contracts, one of the appeals of the smart contract is that you can, using logic, automate or streamline transactions. But smart contracts, as we have learned, work best in the blockchain context when the assets at issue are digital. So if you can create a digital version of an external thing, the idea goes, you can make a bunch of new more efficient transactions related to that thing. That’s sort of the big picture idea. But of course there are some complications to this.

Complications of Tokenization (28:15)

Let’s take the house as an example. I have a token that represents my house and the idea is I can do a transaction of that token to another party and then the bearer, or the holder, or the party that controls the token can then control the house. Cool idea, but it sort of ignores all of the legal and regulatory infrastructure around a home.
If you want to actually replicate that transaction in a digital way, you have to either change the way the law works, or you have to have the law recognize this new system. To my knowledge, there are very few tokenized systems that actually are designed around and reflective of the law that impact the item that has been tokenized.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to tokenisation [link] [comments]

Tokenization and Crypto Taxation [PODCAST]

Hi everyone, I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share with you our new episode regarding Tokenization and Crypto Taxation. I hope you find it interesting and informative, also if you have any topics you would like us to discuss in further episodes please let me know. Our purpose is to help individuals better understand the relationship between cryptocurrency and taxation.
Enjoy the episode
Episode Page
Audio Only
Our guest today is Andrew (Drew) Hinkes, an Attorney at Carlton Fields and Adjunct Professor at the NYU Stern Business School and the NYU School of Law. Last time Drew was on the podcast, back in June 2019, we discussed gaps in the current crypto tax guidance and what it was like to have the unique opportunity to teach a college course on cryptocurrency.
Drew updates us on what has changed in his world, and the world of crypto, since we last spoke. He shares how the coronavirus impacted his life as a professor, lawyer, and cryptocurrency advocate. In addition, Drew gives us a crash course on tokenization – providing our listeners with an analysis of the current landscape, and future of, tokenized assets.

Episode Highlights

Drew’s Background in Law and Tech (02:32)

Many lawyers don’t necessarily have a technical background. Law has not traditionally been the most technology progressive sort of industry. So I had a little bit of a head start over many of my peers because I know how to read some code. I understand databases and because I had experience working with technology, I had a little bit of a head start on wrapping my head around Bitcoin. I think it probably only took me about a year and a half to really get it.

The effects of Coronavirus on Tax Guidance (04:55)

It could be that the issuance of additional guidance is just not a priority right now. I have no independent insight what the IRS is or is not thinking or doing right now. I will say anecdotally, other agencies that are focused more on enforcement, like the SEC and the CFTC, have not stepped down their efforts because of the coronavirus. Again, we’re sort of reading tea leaves here, but it would not surprise me if we saw some of the same issues that plagued the IRS between 2014 and 2019 pop back up where showing additional guidance might be de-prioritized at least on a temporary basis.

The Coronavirus and Crypto (10:45)

From a sort of a macro standpoint, there has always been certain sort of non traditional communities that flocked to Bitcoin and to cryptocurrencies generally. Some of the earlier communities were very focused on alternative economic systems – seeing Bitcoin as something that can change the way the world works, separate money from the state and so forth. And there was a large community of people who are preppers thinking that governments were gonna fall and that economic systems, since they’ve gone off the gold standard in 1970 we’re destined for failure. And to a certain degree, these communities probably feel somewhat vindicated because we’d seen the overall fragility of our economy.

The Future of Crypto (24:35)

I think the coronavirus challenge has brought to the forefront some elements of how the economy works that we don’t usually really think about that much. Mostly folks in the finance world think about who’s really pulling the levers and how central governments control economies. We’ve seen the need to get cash out into people’s hands and how, at least in the United States, the federal reserve can produce as much money as is necessary in order to fund this. So in these new change conditions, there are new opportunities.
Again, I try not to give business or legal advice on a podcast, even this one Sal, but my suggestion would be for people to think about being flexible and to think about being adaptive. I don’t think a successful investor strategy right now looks at the economy the same way that they did a year ago. And so as people start to think outside of their comfort zones, and start to figure out ways to be nimble as conditions change. It’s entirely possible that folks will come around and understand that instruments like Bitcoin and some of the other alternatives arising out of the crypto world, might become new attractive options.

A Crash Course in Tokenization (26:42)

I guess the simplest way to think about tokenization…is the attempt to create a digital representation of a real life thing. Whether it’s property, whether it’s a right or some sort of asset. The concept behind tokenization is you can create a digital twin of the item and then take advantage of the powers and rights associated with tokenization versus the physical asset. For example, a token that represents a property right or a house. The argument goes if you tokenize that asset, you can take advantage of the speed of transaction, the liquidity associated with the assets. That sort of thing is the big picture idea.
If you like smart contracts, one of the appeals of the smart contract is that you can, using logic, automate or streamline transactions. But smart contracts, as we have learned, work best in the blockchain context when the assets at issue are digital. So if you can create a digital version of an external thing, the idea goes, you can make a bunch of new more efficient transactions related to that thing. That’s sort of the big picture idea. But of course there are some complications to this.

Complications of Tokenization (28:15)

Let’s take the house as an example. I have a token that represents my house and the idea is I can do a transaction of that token to another party and then the bearer, or the holder, or the party that controls the token can then control the house. Cool idea, but it sort of ignores all of the legal and regulatory infrastructure around a home.
If you want to actually replicate that transaction in a digital way, you have to either change the way the law works, or you have to have the law recognize this new system. To my knowledge, there are very few tokenized systems that actually are designed around and reflective of the law that impact the item that has been tokenized.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to Tokenbazaar [link] [comments]

Tokenization and Crypto Taxation [PODCAST]

Hi everyone, I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share with you our new episode regarding Tokenization and Crypto Taxation. I hope you find it interesting and informative, also if you have any topics you would like us to discuss in further episodes please let me know. Our purpose is to help individuals better understand the relationship between cryptocurrency and taxation.
Enjoy the episode
Episode Page
Audio Only
Our guest today is Andrew (Drew) Hinkes, an Attorney at Carlton Fields and Adjunct Professor at the NYU Stern Business School and the NYU School of Law. Last time Drew was on the podcast, back in June 2019, we discussed gaps in the current crypto tax guidance and what it was like to have the unique opportunity to teach a college course on cryptocurrency.
Drew updates us on what has changed in his world, and the world of crypto, since we last spoke. He shares how the coronavirus impacted his life as a professor, lawyer, and cryptocurrency advocate. In addition, Drew gives us a crash course on tokenization – providing our listeners with an analysis of the current landscape, and future of, tokenized assets.

Episode Highlights

Drew’s Background in Law and Tech (02:32)

Many lawyers don’t necessarily have a technical background. Law has not traditionally been the most technology progressive sort of industry. So I had a little bit of a head start over many of my peers because I know how to read some code. I understand databases and because I had experience working with technology, I had a little bit of a head start on wrapping my head around Bitcoin. I think it probably only took me about a year and a half to really get it.

The effects of Coronavirus on Tax Guidance (04:55)

It could be that the issuance of additional guidance is just not a priority right now. I have no independent insight what the IRS is or is not thinking or doing right now. I will say anecdotally, other agencies that are focused more on enforcement, like the SEC and the CFTC, have not stepped down their efforts because of the coronavirus. Again, we’re sort of reading tea leaves here, but it would not surprise me if we saw some of the same issues that plagued the IRS between 2014 and 2019 pop back up where showing additional guidance might be de-prioritized at least on a temporary basis.

The Coronavirus and Crypto (10:45)

From a sort of a macro standpoint, there has always been certain sort of non traditional communities that flocked to Bitcoin and to cryptocurrencies generally. Some of the earlier communities were very focused on alternative economic systems – seeing Bitcoin as something that can change the way the world works, separate money from the state and so forth. And there was a large community of people who are preppers thinking that governments were gonna fall and that economic systems, since they’ve gone off the gold standard in 1970 we’re destined for failure. And to a certain degree, these communities probably feel somewhat vindicated because we’d seen the overall fragility of our economy.

The Future of Crypto (24:35)

I think the coronavirus challenge has brought to the forefront some elements of how the economy works that we don’t usually really think about that much. Mostly folks in the finance world think about who’s really pulling the levers and how central governments control economies. We’ve seen the need to get cash out into people’s hands and how, at least in the United States, the federal reserve can produce as much money as is necessary in order to fund this. So in these new change conditions, there are new opportunities.
Again, I try not to give business or legal advice on a podcast, even this one Sal, but my suggestion would be for people to think about being flexible and to think about being adaptive. I don’t think a successful investor strategy right now looks at the economy the same way that they did a year ago. And so as people start to think outside of their comfort zones, and start to figure out ways to be nimble as conditions change. It’s entirely possible that folks will come around and understand that instruments like Bitcoin and some of the other alternatives arising out of the crypto world, might become new attractive options.

A Crash Course in Tokenization (26:42)

I guess the simplest way to think about tokenization…is the attempt to create a digital representation of a real life thing. Whether it’s property, whether it’s a right or some sort of asset. The concept behind tokenization is you can create a digital twin of the item and then take advantage of the powers and rights associated with tokenization versus the physical asset. For example, a token that represents a property right or a house. The argument goes if you tokenize that asset, you can take advantage of the speed of transaction, the liquidity associated with the assets. That sort of thing is the big picture idea.
If you like smart contracts, one of the appeals of the smart contract is that you can, using logic, automate or streamline transactions. But smart contracts, as we have learned, work best in the blockchain context when the assets at issue are digital. So if you can create a digital version of an external thing, the idea goes, you can make a bunch of new more efficient transactions related to that thing. That’s sort of the big picture idea. But of course there are some complications to this.

Complications of Tokenization (28:15)

Let’s take the house as an example. I have a token that represents my house and the idea is I can do a transaction of that token to another party and then the bearer, or the holder, or the party that controls the token can then control the house. Cool idea, but it sort of ignores all of the legal and regulatory infrastructure around a home.
If you want to actually replicate that transaction in a digital way, you have to either change the way the law works, or you have to have the law recognize this new system. To my knowledge, there are very few tokenized systems that actually are designed around and reflective of the law that impact the item that has been tokenized.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to BitcoinGuide [link] [comments]

Tokenization and Crypto Taxation [PODCAST]

Hi everyone, I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share with you our new episode regarding Tokenization and Crypto Taxation. I hope you find it interesting and informative, also if you have any topics you would like us to discuss in further episodes please let me know. Our purpose is to help individuals better understand the relationship between cryptocurrency and taxation.
Enjoy the episode
Episode Page
Audio Only
Our guest today is Andrew (Drew) Hinkes, an Attorney at Carlton Fields and Adjunct Professor at the NYU Stern Business School and the NYU School of Law. Last time Drew was on the podcast, back in June 2019, we discussed gaps in the current crypto tax guidance and what it was like to have the unique opportunity to teach a college course on cryptocurrency.
Drew updates us on what has changed in his world, and the world of crypto, since we last spoke. He shares how the coronavirus impacted his life as a professor, lawyer, and cryptocurrency advocate. In addition, Drew gives us a crash course on tokenization – providing our listeners with an analysis of the current landscape, and future of, tokenized assets.

Episode Highlights

Drew’s Background in Law and Tech (02:32)

Many lawyers don’t necessarily have a technical background. Law has not traditionally been the most technology progressive sort of industry. So I had a little bit of a head start over many of my peers because I know how to read some code. I understand databases and because I had experience working with technology, I had a little bit of a head start on wrapping my head around Bitcoin. I think it probably only took me about a year and a half to really get it.

The effects of Coronavirus on Tax Guidance (04:55)

It could be that the issuance of additional guidance is just not a priority right now. I have no independent insight what the IRS is or is not thinking or doing right now. I will say anecdotally, other agencies that are focused more on enforcement, like the SEC and the CFTC, have not stepped down their efforts because of the coronavirus. Again, we’re sort of reading tea leaves here, but it would not surprise me if we saw some of the same issues that plagued the IRS between 2014 and 2019 pop back up where showing additional guidance might be de-prioritized at least on a temporary basis.

The Coronavirus and Crypto (10:45)

From a sort of a macro standpoint, there has always been certain sort of non traditional communities that flocked to Bitcoin and to cryptocurrencies generally. Some of the earlier communities were very focused on alternative economic systems – seeing Bitcoin as something that can change the way the world works, separate money from the state and so forth. And there was a large community of people who are preppers thinking that governments were gonna fall and that economic systems, since they’ve gone off the gold standard in 1970 we’re destined for failure. And to a certain degree, these communities probably feel somewhat vindicated because we’d seen the overall fragility of our economy.

The Future of Crypto (24:35)

I think the coronavirus challenge has brought to the forefront some elements of how the economy works that we don’t usually really think about that much. Mostly folks in the finance world think about who’s really pulling the levers and how central governments control economies. We’ve seen the need to get cash out into people’s hands and how, at least in the United States, the federal reserve can produce as much money as is necessary in order to fund this. So in these new change conditions, there are new opportunities.
Again, I try not to give business or legal advice on a podcast, even this one Sal, but my suggestion would be for people to think about being flexible and to think about being adaptive. I don’t think a successful investor strategy right now looks at the economy the same way that they did a year ago. And so as people start to think outside of their comfort zones, and start to figure out ways to be nimble as conditions change. It’s entirely possible that folks will come around and understand that instruments like Bitcoin and some of the other alternatives arising out of the crypto world, might become new attractive options.

A Crash Course in Tokenization (26:42)

I guess the simplest way to think about tokenization…is the attempt to create a digital representation of a real life thing. Whether it’s property, whether it’s a right or some sort of asset. The concept behind tokenization is you can create a digital twin of the item and then take advantage of the powers and rights associated with tokenization versus the physical asset. For example, a token that represents a property right or a house. The argument goes if you tokenize that asset, you can take advantage of the speed of transaction, the liquidity associated with the assets. That sort of thing is the big picture idea.
If you like smart contracts, one of the appeals of the smart contract is that you can, using logic, automate or streamline transactions. But smart contracts, as we have learned, work best in the blockchain context when the assets at issue are digital. So if you can create a digital version of an external thing, the idea goes, you can make a bunch of new more efficient transactions related to that thing. That’s sort of the big picture idea. But of course there are some complications to this.

Complications of Tokenization (28:15)

Let’s take the house as an example. I have a token that represents my house and the idea is I can do a transaction of that token to another party and then the bearer, or the holder, or the party that controls the token can then control the house. Cool idea, but it sort of ignores all of the legal and regulatory infrastructure around a home.
If you want to actually replicate that transaction in a digital way, you have to either change the way the law works, or you have to have the law recognize this new system. To my knowledge, there are very few tokenized systems that actually are designed around and reflective of the law that impact the item that has been tokenized.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

Tokenization and Crypto Taxation [PODCAST]

Hi everyone, I’m Isa, producer of The Bitcoin Taxes Podcast and I want to share with you our new episode regarding Tokenization and Crypto Taxation. I hope you find it interesting and informative, also if you have any topics you would like us to discuss in further episodes please let me know. Our purpose is to help individuals better understand the relationship between cryptocurrency and taxation.
Enjoy the episode
Episode Page
Audio Only
Our guest today is Andrew (Drew) Hinkes, an Attorney at Carlton Fields and Adjunct Professor at the NYU Stern Business School and the NYU School of Law. Last time Drew was on the podcast, back in June 2019, we discussed gaps in the current crypto tax guidance and what it was like to have the unique opportunity to teach a college course on cryptocurrency.
Drew updates us on what has changed in his world, and the world of crypto, since we last spoke. He shares how the coronavirus impacted his life as a professor, lawyer, and cryptocurrency advocate. In addition, Drew gives us a crash course on tokenization – providing our listeners with an analysis of the current landscape, and future of, tokenized assets.

Episode Highlights

Drew’s Background in Law and Tech (02:32)

Many lawyers don’t necessarily have a technical background. Law has not traditionally been the most technology progressive sort of industry. So I had a little bit of a head start over many of my peers because I know how to read some code. I understand databases and because I had experience working with technology, I had a little bit of a head start on wrapping my head around Bitcoin. I think it probably only took me about a year and a half to really get it.

The effects of Coronavirus on Tax Guidance (04:55)

It could be that the issuance of additional guidance is just not a priority right now. I have no independent insight what the IRS is or is not thinking or doing right now. I will say anecdotally, other agencies that are focused more on enforcement, like the SEC and the CFTC, have not stepped down their efforts because of the coronavirus. Again, we’re sort of reading tea leaves here, but it would not surprise me if we saw some of the same issues that plagued the IRS between 2014 and 2019 pop back up where showing additional guidance might be de-prioritized at least on a temporary basis.

The Coronavirus and Crypto (10:45)

From a sort of a macro standpoint, there has always been certain sort of non traditional communities that flocked to Bitcoin and to cryptocurrencies generally. Some of the earlier communities were very focused on alternative economic systems – seeing Bitcoin as something that can change the way the world works, separate money from the state and so forth. And there was a large community of people who are preppers thinking that governments were gonna fall and that economic systems, since they’ve gone off the gold standard in 1970 we’re destined for failure. And to a certain degree, these communities probably feel somewhat vindicated because we’d seen the overall fragility of our economy.

The Future of Crypto (24:35)

I think the coronavirus challenge has brought to the forefront some elements of how the economy works that we don’t usually really think about that much. Mostly folks in the finance world think about who’s really pulling the levers and how central governments control economies. We’ve seen the need to get cash out into people’s hands and how, at least in the United States, the federal reserve can produce as much money as is necessary in order to fund this. So in these new change conditions, there are new opportunities.
Again, I try not to give business or legal advice on a podcast, even this one Sal, but my suggestion would be for people to think about being flexible and to think about being adaptive. I don’t think a successful investor strategy right now looks at the economy the same way that they did a year ago. And so as people start to think outside of their comfort zones, and start to figure out ways to be nimble as conditions change. It’s entirely possible that folks will come around and understand that instruments like Bitcoin and some of the other alternatives arising out of the crypto world, might become new attractive options.

A Crash Course in Tokenization (26:42)

I guess the simplest way to think about tokenization…is the attempt to create a digital representation of a real life thing. Whether it’s property, whether it’s a right or some sort of asset. The concept behind tokenization is you can create a digital twin of the item and then take advantage of the powers and rights associated with tokenization versus the physical asset. For example, a token that represents a property right or a house. The argument goes if you tokenize that asset, you can take advantage of the speed of transaction, the liquidity associated with the assets. That sort of thing is the big picture idea.
If you like smart contracts, one of the appeals of the smart contract is that you can, using logic, automate or streamline transactions. But smart contracts, as we have learned, work best in the blockchain context when the assets at issue are digital. So if you can create a digital version of an external thing, the idea goes, you can make a bunch of new more efficient transactions related to that thing. That’s sort of the big picture idea. But of course there are some complications to this.

Complications of Tokenization (28:15)

Let’s take the house as an example. I have a token that represents my house and the idea is I can do a transaction of that token to another party and then the bearer, or the holder, or the party that controls the token can then control the house. Cool idea, but it sort of ignores all of the legal and regulatory infrastructure around a home.
If you want to actually replicate that transaction in a digital way, you have to either change the way the law works, or you have to have the law recognize this new system. To my knowledge, there are very few tokenized systems that actually are designed around and reflective of the law that impact the item that has been tokenized.
submitted by IsaN-BitcoinTax to Tokenization [link] [comments]

Analyzing the new 2019 Crypto Tax Guidelines (Podcast & Summary)

Hey all - I typically post my podcast episodes on our personal subreddit, and on this subreddit. Here's my interview with Tyson Cross. Disclaimer, I work for BitcoinTaxes. The summary is a bit longer than usual, but there were a lot of parts that I thought were important to highlight from this episode.
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The IRS has recently released new tax guidance for cryptocurrency trading – the first official guidance released in over 5 years, since March 2014. Tyson Cross, a tax attorney who specializes in cryptocurrency taxation, joins me on The BitcoinTaxes Podcast to analyze this new guidance.
In addition to analyzing the new guidelines (and Tyson providing his expertise) we answered some questions from Reddit users as well (starting @ 44:50).
Link to the podcast episode page
Link to the podcast audio
Summary/Highlights:
Two Components – Revenue Ruling & FAQ (1:08):
The revenue ruling creates some problems. The FAQ, for the most part, is not too problematic. But – I’d say on the net whole, both maybe create more questions than they answer, unfortunately.

The Revenue Ruling – Airdrops & Forks (2:28):
Revenue Ruling 2019-24 is what the IRS released and specifically it addresses this issue of hard forks and airdrops, which until now has really gone unanswered. There’s been a lot of debate in the tax community about whether hard forks and airdrops are taxable events…whether they satisfy these kinds of requirements that we have from existing law for treating something as a taxable event. The big two are: do you have an ascension to wealth – meaning is the thing you received valuable? Number two, do you have dominion and control over it – meaning are you free to treat it as your own? If those two things are met, then generally speaking, you have taxable income.
The problem is applying those two standards to hard forks or airdrops is actually pretty difficult. The revenue ruling here attempts to make that application – but the problem is that the facts they use are problematic…and don’t seem to really adequately describe a hard fork or an airdrop. This revenue ruling is broken down into two situations where the IRS lays out the facts and then applies the law and reaches a conclusion about whether or not these events are taxable.
They say situation one is not a taxable event because the taxpayer did not receive additional units of virtual currency. But in situation two, the IRS says that it was a taxable event because the taxpayer not only received units of virtual currency from the followup airdrop, but also had dominion and control, because the taxpayer could immediately sell them if he or she wanted to. Situation one is not taxable. Situation two is taxable. So where do most hard forks like the BTC/BCH hard fork fit in? Strictly speaking, if you really took those revenue ruling at face value using the plain language, it doesn’t fit into either one because the BTC/BCH hard fork wasn’t followed by an airdrop.
This revenue ruling, like many issues that have come up with cryptocurrency, puts taxpayers in a really hard spot where they are left yet again guessing what the IRS wants them to do. If you don’t want to have any problems with the IRS in the future, I would tell you to go ahead and report every hard fork and every airdrop as a taxable event.

The IRS FAQ on Virtual Currency Transactions – Specific Identification Methods (22:30):
One of the big questions that’s been floating around the virtual currency space now for years is what methods do you use to calculate your cost basis? FIFO (First In First Out) is the default approach for shares of stock – so, kind of unsurprisingly, the IRS said in the FAQ Question #38 that FIFO is the default method also for virtual currency.
What was maybe a little bit surprising is that the IRS also says in Question #37 that you can use specific identification for virtual currency. This was actually a little surprising to me because the requirements for using specific identification for shares of stock is actually a little burdensome. In Question #37, the IRS sets what I would consider a pretty low bar to use specific identification for cryptocurrency transactions.
Specific identification would mean that instead of just assuming you’re selling your first Bitcoin, the oldest Bitcoin in your wallet, you can actually look at all of your holdings and pick which one you’re selling when you do a sale. So you could pick the one with the highest cost basis if you wanted (HCFO), or you could pick the newest one in your wallet (LIFO). So this opens up a lot of possibilities for taxpayers to be a little more strategic about how their gains are reported. Using specific identification, taxpayers can maybe choose the cost basis method that causes them to have the lowest amount of capital gains.
Most people listening should be relatively happy to hear that specific identification is possible. The question is what do you have to do to be allowed to use it? Question #37 says that you have to have records showing the transaction information for all units of the specific virtual currency held in a single account wallet or address. The question goes on to say that the information must show four things: the date and time each unit was acquired, your cost basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, the time and date each unit was sold or otherwise disposed of, and the fair market value of each unit when it was sold or disposed of. Well those are four things that we pretty much have already, every time we do a transaction with virtual currency – if you trade on coin on a Poloniex, when you download your transaction report, it’s going to show all four of those things every time.

Unchanged Guidelines & Unanswered Questions (29:43):
I would say most things weren’t changed by this guidance. And that’s one of the things that’s maybe a little disappointing about the updated FAQ and the Revenue Ruling. A lot of it we already knew, especially in the FAQ – it kind of just flushes out some of the smaller points. But generally, the basic principles that we’ve been operating under for the last five years are all still in place.
We know that basically any transaction conducted with virtual currency is a taxable event and it’s generally capital gains and reported on Schedule D of your tax return. That part of it is still the same – nothing changed. The FAQ also addresses things like mining. We’ve known for a while that you have ordinary income based on the value of that coin at the time that it is mined. That logic would apply to staking rewards and other similar receipts of virtual currency. Also if you get paid in virtual currency, you know that’s taxable. Whether you’re an employee, or you’re a business selling goods or services, those are all taxable events.
There are still some big unanswered questions that we have and hopefully we get some guidance on that soon. I think the big thing they missed, and it’s really disappointing, was the issue about foreign account reporting.We’ve been asking this question now for five years or longer, about whether accounts held at foreign cryptocurrency exchanges are subject to reporting on FBAR or under FATCA on Form 8938. The question is, does an account at a foreign cryptocurrency exchange fall within the definitions used for the FBAR and Form 8938? And the answer is that we don’t know.

Retroactive Guidelines (34:20):
Most IRS rulings are retroactive unless otherwise stated. The Revenue Ruling and FAQ do not identify an exception to that. So I would say that these are retroactive.
Should you go back and amend past years? That’s a tough question to answer. I’d say talk to your tax preparer or advisor and see what they think. A lot of that depends on how much income it was, how much the rest of your income was on your tax return, how much time is left on the statute of limitations. It’s not an easy question to apply generally. But certainly you should look into it because the IRS will be following this revenue ruling retroactively.

Questions from the Community @ 44:50:
Tyson answers questions from social media, Reddit, and from BitcoinTaxes users.

Important Links:
IRS FAQ
Rev. Rul. 2019-24 (PDF)
BitcoinTaxes Summary
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Analyzing the new 2019 Crypto Tax Guidelines (Podcast & Summary)

The IRS has recently released new tax guidance for cryptocurrency trading – the first official guidance released in over 5 years, since March 2014. Tyson Cross, a tax attorney who specializes in cryptocurrency taxation, joins me on The BitcoinTaxes Podcast to analyze this new guidance.
In addition to analyzing the new guidelines (and Tyson providing his expertise) we answered some questions from Reddit users as well (starting @ 44:50).
Link to the podcast episode page
Link to the podcast audio
Summary/Highlights:
Two Components – Revenue Ruling & FAQ (1:08):
The revenue ruling creates some problems. The FAQ, for the most part, is not too problematic. But – I’d say on the net whole, both maybe create more questions than they answer, unfortunately.

The Revenue Ruling – Airdrops & Forks (2:28):
Revenue Ruling 2019-24 is what the IRS released and specifically it addresses this issue of hard forks and airdrops, which until now has really gone unanswered. There’s been a lot of debate in the tax community about whether hard forks and airdrops are taxable events…whether they satisfy these kinds of requirements that we have from existing law for treating something as a taxable event. The big two are: do you have an ascension to wealth – meaning is the thing you received valuable? Number two, do you have dominion and control over it – meaning are you free to treat it as your own? If those two things are met, then generally speaking, you have taxable income.
The problem is applying those two standards to hard forks or airdrops is actually pretty difficult. The revenue ruling here attempts to make that application – but the problem is that the facts they use are problematic…and don’t seem to really adequately describe a hard fork or an airdrop. This revenue ruling is broken down into two situations where the IRS lays out the facts and then applies the law and reaches a conclusion about whether or not these events are taxable.
They say situation one is not a taxable event because the taxpayer did not receive additional units of virtual currency. But in situation two, the IRS says that it was a taxable event because the taxpayer not only received units of virtual currency from the followup airdrop, but also had dominion and control, because the taxpayer could immediately sell them if he or she wanted to. Situation one is not taxable. Situation two is taxable. So where do most hard forks like the BTC/BCH hard fork fit in? Strictly speaking, if you really took those revenue ruling at face value using the plain language, it doesn’t fit into either one because the BTC/BCH hard fork wasn’t followed by an airdrop.
This revenue ruling, like many issues that have come up with cryptocurrency, puts taxpayers in a really hard spot where they are left yet again guessing what the IRS wants them to do. If you don’t want to have any problems with the IRS in the future, I would tell you to go ahead and report every hard fork and every airdrop as a taxable event.

The IRS FAQ on Virtual Currency Transactions – Specific Identification Methods (22:30):
One of the big questions that’s been floating around the virtual currency space now for years is what methods do you use to calculate your cost basis? FIFO (First In First Out) is the default approach for shares of stock – so, kind of unsurprisingly, the IRS said in the FAQ Question #38 that FIFO is the default method also for virtual currency.
What was maybe a little bit surprising is that the IRS also says in Question #37 that you can use specific identification for virtual currency. This was actually a little surprising to me because the requirements for using specific identification for shares of stock is actually a little burdensome. In Question #37, the IRS sets what I would consider a pretty low bar to use specific identification for cryptocurrency transactions.
Specific identification would mean that instead of just assuming you’re selling your first Bitcoin, the oldest Bitcoin in your wallet, you can actually look at all of your holdings and pick which one you’re selling when you do a sale. So you could pick the one with the highest cost basis if you wanted (HCFO), or you could pick the newest one in your wallet (LIFO). So this opens up a lot of possibilities for taxpayers to be a little more strategic about how their gains are reported. Using specific identification, taxpayers can maybe choose the cost basis method that causes them to have the lowest amount of capital gains.
Most people listening should be relatively happy to hear that specific identification is possible. The question is what do you have to do to be allowed to use it? Question #37 says that you have to have records showing the transaction information for all units of the specific virtual currency held in a single account wallet or address. The question goes on to say that the information must show four things: the date and time each unit was acquired, your cost basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, the time and date each unit was sold or otherwise disposed of, and the fair market value of each unit when it was sold or disposed of. Well those are four things that we pretty much have already, every time we do a transaction with virtual currency – if you trade on coin on a Poloniex, when you download your transaction report, it’s going to show all four of those things every time.

Unchanged Guidelines & Unanswered Questions (29:43):
I would say most things weren’t changed by this guidance. And that’s one of the things that’s maybe a little disappointing about the updated FAQ and the Revenue Ruling. A lot of it we already knew, especially in the FAQ – it kind of just flushes out some of the smaller points. But generally, the basic principles that we’ve been operating under for the last five years are all still in place.
We know that basically any transaction conducted with virtual currency is a taxable event and it’s generally capital gains and reported on Schedule D of your tax return. That part of it is still the same – nothing changed. The FAQ also addresses things like mining. We’ve known for a while that you have ordinary income based on the value of that coin at the time that it is mined. That logic would apply to staking rewards and other similar receipts of virtual currency. Also if you get paid in virtual currency, you know that’s taxable. Whether you’re an employee, or you’re a business selling goods or services, those are all taxable events.
There are still some big unanswered questions that we have and hopefully we get some guidance on that soon. I think the big thing they missed, and it’s really disappointing, was the issue about foreign account reporting.We’ve been asking this question now for five years or longer, about whether accounts held at foreign cryptocurrency exchanges are subject to reporting on FBAR or under FATCA on Form 8938. The question is, does an account at a foreign cryptocurrency exchange fall within the definitions used for the FBAR and Form 8938? And the answer is that we don’t know.

Retroactive Guidelines (34:20):
Most IRS rulings are retroactive unless otherwise stated. The Revenue Ruling and FAQ do not identify an exception to that. So I would say that these are retroactive.
Should you go back and amend past years? That’s a tough question to answer. I’d say talk to your tax preparer or advisor and see what they think. A lot of that depends on how much income it was, how much the rest of your income was on your tax return, how much time is left on the statute of limitations. It’s not an easy question to apply generally. But certainly you should look into it because the IRS will be following this revenue ruling retroactively.

Questions from the Community @ 44:50:
Tyson answers questions from social media, Reddit, and from BitcoinTaxes users.

Important Links:
IRS FAQ
Rev. Rul. 2019-24 (PDF)
BitcoinTaxes Summary
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

Why Dogecoin is going to $1... and beyond. Please keep the shibe people. I have a knack for calling the next big thing, and I feel that Dogecoin may just be it!

As I grew up, I always seemed to be on the cusp of everything new, so trust me that I am no stranger to this game...
But on to Dogecoin. There is not just one 'tipping point' in an innovation, there are several and they are catalysts to each other. Dogecoin has reached a tipping point in the crypto-currency scene and I only see it appreciating in value once our first real crash is over.
The possibilities for crypto-currency are numerous and with the government and big banks starting to recognize it for the first time (as evidenced by the success of bitcoin) we are on to a real revolution here.
Now here's the fun catch. Which was the first successful computer company? But who's the hottest today?
When we look at what makes a successful product, it's not just the technical merits that work. If it were, people wouldn't buy iPhones and iPads. Understand that we stand on the release of the first 'iPod' in the Crypto-currency world. That 'iPod' is Dogecoin.
There were mp3 players before the iPod came out. But they were complicated, and scary! Much techno-babble! But then that little device made mp3 players fun and friendly. It was simultaneously a status symbol and a thing that brought you joy just to own it.
Market psychology tells us people buy things for two reason: to show off to others and for the innate joy that comes from owning something. And if you can capture both?
Dogecoin stands on the brink of doing that. Cute and non-threatening but holding real value, and (this is the most critical aspect) allowing people to feel 'important'. Many posters have really hit the nail on the head: no one wants to own 0.02 Bitcoins... bleh. But even when Dogecoin hits 0.01 cents a coin, it will be fun to own 10,000 of them.
We must continue to distribute and grow our fledgling currency. Tell people about it in a lighthearted and joking way. I am letting all my friends know: "Hey, you guys have heard of bitcoins right? Well there's a new coin in town!"
Dogecoin is destined for bigger things; please don't lose your shibe!
I remember a couple of years ago when Bitcoin crashed from $10 a coin to $2, and everyone was laughing at the idiots who bought bitcoins... Doge will have the last laugh. It has all the market traits of a future successful product, very promise.
The total market cap of Dogecoin would be 100 billion Doge with every coin mined. So here's how much Doge would have to be worth for each major magnitude change:
But it will not get there if we do not spread the shibe selflessly! Currency only has value is people believe in it and it has utility. We need to get Doge into as many hands as possible and work to make connections so people can spend Doge for a variety of goods and services.
It is nobelest of currencies. Much love to all of you. May the shibe be ever in your favor, - americanpegasus DPWJddx2RX4nntLeafeM516kRrvQx7YRLx
submitted by americanpegasus to dogecoin [link] [comments]

The Secret is There is No Secret

 -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA256 tl;dr VISIT THIS: °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ The Secret is there is NO Secret. - - ∵ ƸӜƷ ∴ 𝓐𝓻𝓽𝓲𝓼𝓽𝓲𝓬 𝓓𝓲𝓼𝓬𝓵𝓪𝓲𝓶𝓮𝓻: https://pastebin.com/Ux0Uk2em Once you see #ᵀᴴᴱᴳᴬᴹᴱ23 you cannot unsee it anymore. Once you play #ᵀᴴᴱᴳᴬᴹᴱ23 you cannot unplay it anymore. By reading this you affirm that you are +21 y.o. and that you consent to playing #ᵀᴴᴱᴳᴬᴹᴱ23 Otherwise, if you don't want to risk becoming psychotic, please STOP READING NAO. 🔥 𝖞𝖔𝖚 𝖍𝖆𝖛𝖊 𝖇𝖊𝖊𝖓 𝖜𝖆𝖗𝖓𝖊𝖉 🔥 BIG NEWS!!! This GAME will heal The World. Call The Others and PLAY IT! Read slowly: http://pastebin.com/YbmG6ETq #TheGame23 Source: https://twitter.com/alejodorowsky/status/522097534450552832 By https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alejandro_Jodorowsky MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMM ☯ Welcome to #ᵀᴴᴱᴳᴬᴹᴱ23 ☿ MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMM The Secret is there is NO Secret. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMh.`-+mMmsomMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMs .ho .dMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMs `dMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMs :MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMh` sMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMh. .NMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMN: `mMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMo .:/ohMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMy +NMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMs -mMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNNNNNMMMMMMMm/ .mMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNh/-.``````..:yds-` `+NMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMd/` `dMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMy- /mMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMh- `:/+odMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMs sMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMm` `dMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMo `mMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM/ +MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNM/ `dMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMh.-. +MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMs `+sdMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMm. .dMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMd: `.-+yd+` :yNMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMmo-..` -dMMMMMNd/` `sMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNdyo++/:---...``-yMMMMMMMMNdhhhddmMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMM ...or maybe YES. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM tl;dr: #TheGame23 introduces #DangerousIdea23: ↪ #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑 is a blockchained Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning self-organized System based on a mutating h-index type algorithm. ↪ #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑, as an idea, has been validated —though in any way 'endorsed'— by Google's lead of Google.ai, Google’s AI division, computer scientist Jeff Dean and by Vitalik Buterin, co-founder of Ethereum.. ↪ #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑 will be used by a Team of Sages to assist them in ruling the World and to replace "democrazy" for a true 𝐓𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐧𝐨𝐌𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐳𝐲. [ PROOF of Jeff Dean and Vitalik Buterin's replies to #TheGame23 agent: https://i.imgur.com/CMEvTi0.jpg ] [ PROOF of Jeff Dean and Vitalik Buterin's replies to #TheGame23 agent: https://i.imgur.com/CMEvTi0.jpg ] [ PROOF of Jeff Dean and Vitalik Buterin's replies to #TheGame23 agent: https://i.imgur.com/CMEvTi0.jpg ] ...ticktockticktockticktock... 𝓘 𝓵𝓲𝓴𝓮 𝓽𝓱𝓲𝓼 #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑 𝓲𝓭𝓮𝓪. 𝓗𝓸𝔀 𝓬𝓪𝓷 𝓘 𝓱𝓮𝓵𝓹? ↪ Tweet this: "Bye bye 'democrazy'. Hello TechnoMeritocrazy. Read carefully: https://pastebin.com/FbYPPbrc #TheGame23 #TechnoMeritocrazy #HIVEMIND23" ↪ Share this idea and this pastebin and spread the message with these hasghtags: #HIVEMIND23 and #TechnoMeritocrazy ↪ Create & share original Art, be that an image, a wallpaper, a YouTube video, an mp3... featuring #TheGame23 and the #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑 idea. ↪ Speak about it on boards and social networks. Send a kind email/tweet/DM to experts you know, introducing the idea. ↪ Start an Etherpad/GitHub/Board/whatever and begin to politely brainstorm and discuss design and code ideas with fellow hackers. ↪ Monitor https://twitter.com/search?q=%23TheGame23 and you will be updated with news as they happen. ↪ Join https://TheGame23.com and you will be updated with news as they happen. ƸӜƷ SHALL WE PLAY A GAME? ƸӜƷ ↪ START HERE FIRST; Oct 14, 2014; 30.000 views: https://pastebin.com/YbmG6ETq ↪ #TheGame23 META-Instructions by twitter.com/m1vr4 https://pastebin.com/wDN9DpdC ↪ #TheGame23 Artistic Disclaimer: https://pastebin.com/Ux0Uk2em ^^ .-=-=-=-. ^^ ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ ^^ ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ ^^ ( `-=-=-=-(@)-=-=-` ) ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ (`-= #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑--`) ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-=-=-`) ^^ ^^ (`-=-=-=-=-`) `-=-=-=-=-` "Only those who attempt the absurd can achieve the impossible." Albert Einstein https://i.imgur.com/ldPEVU9.jpg ↪ ʜᴏᴡ ᴛᴏ ʜᴀᴄᴋ ᴛʜᴇ ᴘʟᴀɴᴇᴛ ɪɴ 𝟷 ʟɪɴᴇ ᴏғ ᴄᴏᴅᴇ: ᴛʜᴇ ☢ 𝐓𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐧𝐨𝐌𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐳𝐲 ☸ `-.`'.-' `-. ∵ƸӜƷ∴ .-'. `-. -./\.- .-' -. /_|\ .- `-. `/____\' .-'. `-. -./.-""-.\.- ' `-. /< (()) >\ .-' - .`/__`-..-'__\' .- ,...`-./___|____|___\.-'.,. ,-' ,` . . ', `-, ,-' ________________ `-, ,'/____|_____|_____\ / /__|_____|_____|___\ / /|_____|_____|_____|_\ ' /____|_____|_____|_____\ .' /__|_____|_____|_____|___\ ,' /|_____|_____|_____|_____|_\ ,,---''--...___...--'''--.. /../____|_____|_____|_____|_____\ ..--```--...___...--``---,, '../__|_____|_____|_____|_____|___\ \ ) '.:/|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_\ ( / )\ / ) ,':./____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____\ ( \ /( / / ( ( /:../__|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|___\ ) ) \ \ | | \ \ /.../|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_\ / / | | .-.\ \ \ \ '..:/____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____\ / / / /.-. (= )\ `._.' | \:./ _ _ ___ ____ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___\ | `._.' /( =) \ (_) ) \./ |\/| |__) |___ |___ |___ _X_ _X_ \/ _|_ \ ( (_) / \ `----' """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" `----' / \ ____\__ #HIVEMIND23 ᴛᴇᴄʜɴᴏᴍᴇʀɪᴛᴏᴄʀᴀᴢʏ __/____ / \ (=\ \ / /-) / \_)_\ \ 𝐁𝐥𝐨𝐜𝐤𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐀𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 / /_(_/ \ \ 𝐃𝐞𝐞𝐩 𝐋𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟-𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞𝐝 𝐒𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 / / ) _ ) 𝐦𝐮𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡-𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐱 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐠𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐦 ( _ ( ( (,-' `-..__ __..-' `-,) ) \_.-'' ``-..____ ____..-'' ``-._/ `-._ ``--...____...--'' _.-' `-.._ ∵ ƸӜƷ ∴ _..-' `-..__ #𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐆𝐚𝐦𝐞𝟐𝟑 __..-' ``-..____ εν το παν ____..-'' ``--...____...--'' 𝘿 𝙚 𝙢 𝙤 𝙘 𝙧 𝙖 𝙯 𝙮 𝙞 𝙨 𝙗 𝙧 𝙤 𝙠 𝙚 𝙣 ☠ Let’s fix it. And it’s been broken since the very beginning: Socrates (470 – 399 BC) was killed ‘democratically’. [ See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trial_of_Socrates#Support_for_Oligarchic_Rule_and_Contempt_for_Athenian_Democracy ] Socrates openly espoused certain ‘anti-democratic’ views, most prominent perhaps being the view that it is not majority opinion that yields correct policy but rather genuine knowledge and professional competence, which is possessed by only a few: Socrates set the basis for the future TechnoMeritocracy. Democracy has been broken very especially since the Military-Industrial Complex —as Eisenhower warned us in his famous speech in 1961— and a bunch of psychopaths and ignorants have taken our lives and the lives of our beloved ones as well as the lives of several billion people buried in life. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military-industrial_complex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg-jvHynP9Y - Jan, 17 - 1961 Eisenhower's "Military-Industrial Complex" Speech Origins and Significance This is our State-of-the-Art Pyramid as human species: ***> “The world’s 62 richest people now own as much wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of the global population.” Source: https://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/file_attachments/bp210-economy-one-percent-tax-havens-180116-en_0.pdf ***> “Almost 1 billion people are undernourished or lack vitamins and minerals.” Source: http://www.fao.org/state-of-food-security-nutrition/en/ Is that really the absolute very best that we can do after more than 300.000 years of evolution as Homo Sapiens and 3 million years since the first Homo Habilis? Do you still think that ‘Democrazy’ is the absolute very best way to rule the world? If not, please keep on reading. ↪ ᴡᴇʟᴄᴏᴍᴇ ᴛᴏ ᴛʜᴇ ᴛᴇᴄʜɴᴏᴍᴇʀɪᴛᴏᴄʀᴀᴢʏ These are the 2 central tenets of the ᴛᴇᴄʜɴᴏᴍᴇʀɪᴛᴏᴄʀᴀᴢʏ: ↪ 1. We are NOT all equal: the vote of a psychopath or an ignorant can’t be equal to that of a decent citizen. ↪ 2. Only the ‘scientifically proven’ best and most skillful, the most honest, generous and willing to serve people in the world should rule us. ↪ This is HOW to Hack the Planet in 1 line of ‘Code’: With a blockchained Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning self-organized System based on a ‘mutating’ h-index type algorithm. If you don’t agree with that, please stop reading now. Thank you for your time. If you do agree with that and feel curious to know more, please keep on reading. Thanks. 𝓘 𝓯𝓮𝓮𝓵 𝓬𝓾𝓻𝓲𝓸𝓾𝓼 𝓪𝓷𝓭 𝔀𝓪𝓷𝓽 𝓽𝓸 𝓴𝓷𝓸𝔀 𝓶𝓸𝓻𝓮 In The Internet Galaxy (2001), Manuel Castells (the 2000–2014 research survey of the Social Sciences Citation Index ranks him as the world’s fifth most-cited social science scholar, and the foremost-cited communication scholar in the world) talks about the ‘network society’ culture being techno-meritocratic, for hackers and virtual communitarians, and entrepreneurial. You have to be crazy to question democrazy. Very, very crazy. For you are going to have to fight against 2.500 years of mental and political conditioning and not everybody is ready to dare to get rid of the beliefs and prejudices that the family, the school, the college, the laws, the culture… have unconsciously programmed us with. “It is harder to crack a prejudice than an atom.” Albert Einstein And you are going to have to fight not only with yourself but against the others. For almost nobody is ready to be unplugged from this subtle Prison for our Minds. “The Matrix is a system, Neo. That system is our enemy. But when you’re inside, you look around, what do you see? Businessmen, teachers, lawyers, carpenters. The very minds of the people we are trying to save. But until we do, these people are still a part of that system and that makes them our enemy. You have to understand, most of these people are not ready to be unplugged. And many of them are so inured, so hopelessly dependent on the system, that they will fight to protect it.” Morpheus – The Matrix When you face others in denial regarding this idea you have to remember 2 things: Patience. Perserverance. ↪ #TheGame23 ‘𝓓𝓪𝓷𝓰𝓮𝓻𝓸𝓾𝓼’ 𝓘𝓭𝓮𝓪 𝓝𝓾𝓶𝓫𝓮𝓻 23: Let’s build #𝐇𝐈𝐕𝐄𝐌𝐈𝐍𝐃𝟐𝟑, a 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐖𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐓𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐧𝐨𝐌𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐳𝐲. The most apt, the most sage, intelligent, the best prepared, technically or artistically minded, in any of the branches of Human Knowledge —in the Trivium et Quadrivim spirit— and also the most kind, generous and willing to serve the others, as tagged to be the best ones by others like them, will jump straight to the top of a TechnoMeritocratic Pyramid to manage and administrate world material and human resources world wide. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figurative_system_of_human_knowledge https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trivium https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadrivium How? Hacking the Planet with 1 line of ‘Code’: With a blockchained Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning self-organized System based on a ‘mutating’ h-index type algorithm. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blockchain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_learning https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-organization https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-index https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algorithm 𝐈𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐞 This is ONLY a draft for the implementation of the idea: the idea has to be implemented by a Community of Hackers and Experts and not by a single individual. Now… Imagine a Pyramid of Excellence and Nobility with 10? (just to say a number) Supersages, Conscious Scientifics and Artists, all powerful, each one of these an expert in one branch of Human Knowledge, in the Liberal Arts education, in the Trivium et Quadrivium style, whom were tagged and chosen to be the Supersages by the human community, according to an h-index type algorithm. The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar. This could be used to implement a kind of “PageRank” for people, where the people most knowledgeable about a subject would ascend steps in the Pyramid and whose tags/votes would carry more weight in the algorithm to be computed by an Artificial Intelligence system than those on the base of the Pyramid. Imagine that those Supersages could be rotating each certain time (in order to avoid corruption or abuses of power), as determined by the Council of Computer Scientists in charge for the development of the algorithm. Imagine that the algorithm was used so that those 10 Supersages or Experts could designate other sub-experts, whom would designate other sub-experts one step below in the Pyramid to assist them, whom could designate further sub-experts down the Pyramid and so on and so forth… in order to work with concrete and urgent issues such as the search for the cure of cancer or any Global Catastrophic Risks such as the imminent threat of Climate Change. Maybe the fact that trusting 10 Supersages on top of the Pyramid to manage the planet thanks to an Artificial Intelligence permanently mutating in its algorithm might sound a bit distopic, right? Well, that’s an easy one: let’s try and see what happens: that’s the hacker attitude, right? See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberal_arts_education https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Author-level_metric https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citation_impact https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PageRank https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_catastrophic_risk How to test the validity of this ‘𝐃𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬’ 𝐈𝐝𝐞𝐚 #23? First an anonymous #TheGame23 agent wondered who might be the best person in the world to understand this idea. S/he needed only the absolute very best: in the same spirit that we would do if we had the System already built. This is Jeff Dean: https://www.csail.mit.edu/sites/default/files/2018-10/Jeff-Dean-FINAL.jpg Jeff Dean, computer scientist and software engineer. He is currently the lead of Google.ai, Google’s AI division. If you want to know more about Jeff Dean’s work at Google, this is his home page: https://ai.google/research/people/jeff If you are not deeply impressed enough yet, you can read "The Jeff Dean Facts". [ http://www.informatika.bg/jeffdean ] Due to his impressive background and expertise, and as lead of Google’s Artificial Intelligence division, Jeff seemed to be exceptionally well positioned to understand the idea. 𝟏𝟎 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 ‘𝐂𝐨𝐝𝐞’ 𝐭𝐨 𝐇𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐭 Several years ago, on Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 11:43 AM an anonymous #TheGame23 player sent these 10 lines of ‘Code’ to Jeff Dean: Hi Mr. Dean, Have you considered building a “PageRank” for people? Imagine the following scenario: a meteorite is detected and it is predicted that it will hit the Earth in 24 months. Suddenly, a worldwide challenge arises: to arrange a team in the shortest amount of time with the best engineers in the whole world coordinating world resources in order to work together towards deviating/desintegrating such threat to human survival. Idea: a kind of a “h-index” would solve this in the shortest amount of time. A Reputation Engine that would rank items (where items = human beings or products) according to a certain parameter, be it “trust”, “skillfulness at mathematics”, “knowledge about meteorites”, “leadership”, “honesty”…, etc. In our view, this could hugely improve the world for the better, not only to deviate meteorites but to manage anything from running a company to running nationwide governments. Question: do you see this as impossible to code? If you want more info, please let me know. Regards, [#TheGame23 player] Jeff Dean kindly replied to that message on Nov 10, 2015, 5:14 AM: Hi [#TheGame23 player], I’ve thought about similar things a few times. I do think there are lots of benefits in getting people with similar interests that don’t otherwise know each other or interact to do so. Unfortunately, I haven’t had a lot of time to work on this. I think that one would really want it to not be a single PageRank value per person, but rather a context-sensitive value, depending on what kinds of expertise was of interest. Someone that knows a lot about the structure of concrete should be very high in the context of answering materials sciences kinds of questions, but probably low in the context of answering psychology questions. A good place to start might be to use large corpora of published scientific articles as the way of computing this information. Unfortunately, I’m busy enough with other things that these ideas remain mostly just occasional thoughts rather than an active project. –Jeff Excellent. Jeff Dean not only understood #TheGame23 player's idea but he actually shared some ideas about how to improve it. Unfortunately —and understandbly— he is quite busy to develop it. Thank you Jeff. Then that #TheGame23 player thought that it was needed to contact the absolute very best person in the world to understand blockchain and cryptocurrencies. That person was that genius called Vitalik Buterin, obviously. Co-founder of Ethereum, THE blockchain platform. Vitalik Buterin: https://i.imgur.com/W9CRCx5.png Vitalik Buterin (Russian: Виталий Дмитриевич Бутерин; born January 31, 1994) is a Russian–Canadian programmer and writer primarily known as a co-founder of Ethereum and as a co-founder of Bitcoin Magazine. On Mon, May 2, 2016 at 5:45 AM that #TheGame23 player sent to Vitalik the same email that s/he sent to Jeff Dean. He got back on Tue, May 3, 2016, 12:48 AM with the following reply: Hmm, sounds like what you’re describing essentially is what we call a “decentralized reputation system”. So yes, quite doable on ethereum, and there may be groups trying to do it already. Great. Vitalik also understood the idea and even assured #TheGame23 player that it could be done on Ethereum. Thank you Vitalik. [ PROOF of Jeff Dean and Vitalik Buterin's replies to #TheGame23 agent: https://i.imgur.com/CMEvTi0.jpg ] [ PROOF of Jeff Dean and Vitalik Buterin's replies to #TheGame23 agent: https://i.imgur.com/CMEvTi0.jpg ] [ PROOF of Jeff Dean and Vitalik Buterin's replies to #TheGame23 agent: https://i.imgur.com/CMEvTi0.jpg ] #TheGame23 player got the two confirmations that s/he needed: now the System was ready to run on its own. Something like this would definitely change the world for the better. From the technological to the economics, to the political, the ethical and even the philosophical: now we know that it IS doable. 𝓘 𝓵𝓲𝓴𝓮 𝓽𝓱𝓲𝓼 #HIVEMIND23 𝓲𝓭𝓮𝓪. 𝓗𝓸𝔀 𝓬𝓪𝓷 𝓘 𝓱𝓮𝓵𝓹? ↪ Share this idea and this pastebin and spread the message with these hasghtags: #HIVEMIND23 and #TechnoMeritocrazy ↪ Create some original Art, be that an image, a wallpaper, a YouTube video, an mp3... featuring #TheGame23 and the #HIVEMIND23 idea. ↪ Speak about it in boards and social networks. Send a kind email/tweet/DM to experts you know, introducing the idea. ↪ Start an Etherpad/GitHub/Board/whatever and begin to politely brainstorm and discuss design and code ideas with fellow hackers. ↪ Monitor https://twitter.com/search?q=%23TheGame23 and you will be updated with news as they happen. ↪ Join https://TheGame23.com and you will be updated with news as they happen. FAQ: Q: Is #HIVEMIND23 the perfect system of government? A: No. None is. But we firmly believe that, as Socrates sharply suggested —and even died for it—, this is the least bad. Q: Is this a technocrazy? A: No, this is a 𝐓𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐧𝐨𝐌𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐳𝐲. Q: Is this a meritocrazy? A: No, this is a 𝐓𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐧𝐨𝐌𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐳𝐲. Q: Is this a Black Mirror episode like Nosedive? A: No. Q: Is this going to work like the Social Credit System in China? A: No. Not. At. All. Actually this is the polar opposite to that. Q: Why you don’t have the Answers to all the Questions? A: Because we are only humans. Instead, we want all of us to politely dialogue, brainstorm and answer as many questions that we all pose about Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats of this ‘Dangerous’ Idea together. License: Public Domain The anonymous #TheGame23 player who originally sent those several hundred mysterious emails from 2014 to 2016 has released this idea into the Public Domain in order to guarantee that we (the writers of this pastebin/webpage/etc.) don’t pursue any material benefit with it at all. Once it’s been released, the idea doesn’t belong to us anymore: it’s absolutely free for you to act upon it. Or not. 𝐅𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬 We as the global Human kind that we are, face global challenges of an imminent urgency, such as as Climate Change and a million other problems. With millions of children dying of hunger each year, this cannot bet the best of all possible worlds as Leibniz suggested. We must have done something terribly wrong. …are we really thinking that thanks to “““Democrazy””” in all its splendor, we prefer, as it’s been already “““proved””” to be the best type of systems of government, after more than 300.000 years of Evolution, to have in the apex of the Pyramid in order to set the destiny of the world to… …this?: https://media.giphy.com/media/cNNcBeouzDHLBMEGRH/giphy.gif Thank You. Imagine. "You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete." - Buckminster Fuller - https://i.imgur.com/thET9a5.jpg This is for the Crazy ones: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rwsuXHA7RA / \ / \ { } { } { { } } \ \ / / \ Y / .-"`"`"-. ,` 11:11 \ / #ᵀᴴᴱᴳᴬᴹᴱ23 \ / Sir Eliah! \ { ;"";, } { /";`'`,; } \{ ;`,'`;. / { }`""` } /} { } { // {||} { / `"' `"' - tl;dr VISIT THIS: °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com ,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸ ℒℴνℯ, @m1Vr4 #TheGame23 Or maybe yes... - ∵ ƸӜƷ ∴ -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- iQIzBAEBCAAdFiEEHPNFPfMfQ/3nrMIAhVQJMaDeV5UFAlwzwmMACgkQhVQJMaDe V5V4GQ//X9fY8ReMfdfUcaJf/CUN7wjUWzm6WabtvdpBdAJ22FZszwn0fJuybsEb iqoUHVrpFg/3vgu8DN6GM+GWAKCmL7kY+/IaAVkevjjIm8sB4jJdp/8YF89r6OBs fYSWySMin0y2ESLORZYhqAi02yvJV3e1vc9TvlvgIA27L7zV7sCYmwRyG67DdHO8 DF3nhL6vP0AlRu2uMjnsZI7wFPD+EQiQ9N3QBlAB2bdXH2Miw6L6S+O7oKmDH/kq X7B78xYrdA84MICAnFISx6Lo0m/cGruF0+hCn63N2UrVu9Bkq0noXLoPDNEjEzVr e+NPu0tYE7SW1UXZtkUY+guaYzg0aiPKNxnekiC2jV+yBdWoSWWGtN6UAErsDPC5 67FytEsrCBGhgkarDgWXl0MLYX69Ieg9tiqlupFZ8hsZCTQ/JVt52gJRvLvs2fdh 9ujMGbsknWZFiPqU4Onp11e8jorz527sQ5fZ9VzVksOz+DGqt8SJNX0ajHRxgIfR IY8qnMDXUXnUqJmReV/QWDwhoK4byROF5gEB/IsDlkGa0B2ru1izeFx11/HiKlVe 3xQqRYvl7Xg+AoqrbTtC3B4gdrVUeyCrtbY9RJFj3sf0IZ0d3cRFi0ypyRXd1p5r 3Jey+8x4/ccZ5ULGjXF/caFrM5DgnP+eQtoT8BgRrK/Zw6NAJwE= =ybXv -----END PGP SIGNATURE----- 
https://pastebin.com/FbYPPbrc

http://technomeritocrazy.wordpress.com
submitted by ScienTolog2 to publishcopypasta [link] [comments]

Here, List of Merchants Avantages To Accept NYC. Ideas are Welcome

(Please don’t forget that is a transcription about an mp3 made in my car, during my work time. I’m sorry i haven’t got to much time but i want participate to the proliferation of NYC, i will go to discord as soon as i can. If someone could structure or add ideas of avantages for merchants to accept NYC in the spirit of this share or others, it will be great. I imagine a pdf, webpages translate in the most languages possible, to share to every merchants all the community knows in their own country and to share to every e-merchants too. I imagine a simple concept that everyone could duplicate and share as a child could do. With this, everyone without technical knowledges but with a desire to help the community and NYC could built NYC with us. I’m sorry to didn’t structure this better…I’ve not finished yet and i have a lot of others ideas to give merchants but I think this kind of sharing can stimulate the community and some ideas is not definitive, just ideas and not list(please be cool with me), and maybe a wonderful professional template can be made by one of you(lol) and start structure listing where everyone could propose)
Benefits for the first 10 000 or more (?) merchants who will accept the cryptocurrency NYC since now to the next 1 or 2 years(?)
These are the first merchants who will enjoy the greatest benefits of accepting NYC while taking the minimum risk.
Free decentralized money transfer in 30 seconds
saving on bank transaction fees
saving on bank fraud charges (anti-fraud system, irreversible transaction, no more cancellation of payments by credit card, the customer has no money the transaction is denied)
No limit amount for customers, unlimited ceiling, easy to sell expensive products
New customers around the world, savings and margin
New wealthy customers around the world who will love buying your products(because new crypto rich and because convictions)
New single customers who prefer to buy from you rather than from your neighbor. You get cool for them, fans of cryptocurrency and NYC, and the new rich will thank you as it should. Modern and political values ​​that you do not suspect the magnitude .. Potential invaluable, see Cryptocurrency MarketCap, customers will call you to send your products to the other side of the world even with shipping rates higher than average. A fundamental revolution is underway and it is not $ 5 more on shipping costs that will stop it. Human and political values ​​have always been stronger than personal enrichment in the history of humanity. An invaluable potential of customers around the world (depends on your product but NYC will list all merchants and businesses from around the world on the same list to spread it around the world) US Community, Russian, Japan, China, Korea, Portugal, France, Belgium, Spain, Germany, Brazil, Argentina, Ukraine, Vietnam, Thailand etc etc etc
Thanks to savings on banking fees, it is possible to lower the selling price and to be more competitive than the competitors. New customers will appear by converting to cryptocurrency to benefit from your new rates. It's inevitable, be part of the first. Possibility of incredible gain for the 1st who will accumulate the most NYC with almost NO RISK.
If you motivate your partners and suppliers to accept NYC, you save even more on transaction costs and save on both levels (upstream and downstream). Savings which serves you to lower the selling price and increase your margin at the same time
Easy to put in place :
Unlike conventional currency, NYC is yours and no one can seize them, not even governments. Indeed, only you know your private address and you have an unlimited number of public addresses (anonymous and no one knows how much NYC you have). Your private key can be compared to a bank account number. You regain control over your money with only a few easy starting arrangements to put in place once. Either you exchange your NYC in bitcoin / ether then in $ with transfer to bank account and declare your income to your government, or transfer in bitcoin on « credit card system online » usable in store and ATM (wirex etc).
Install Wallet QT, + paperwallet for those who likes security, install coinomi, yobit and coinbase account (and others after) and businesses of credit card online. Stikers on your shop, give photos and videos to NYC community and wait new customers to accumulate NYC with no risk
Volatility: If volatility can be considered a real problem in the world of crypto, know that the volatility will be reduced as the use of NYC increases. The price of NYC can only increase and if the world crypto collapses, you will have almost no risk. It's not a fad but a global infatuation. Even if some NYC price drops will happen sometimes, all cryptocurrencies will have to increase in value. And especially NYC with its unique specifics, free and fast bitcoin for Newyorkers, americans and the all world. For proof, despite the incredible increase of the crypto-currencies market cap, we are only at 0.5% of global money flows and bitcoin is only $ 10,000. We are only at the beginning, the beginnings of cryptos. Imagine when crypto accounts for only 1% 2% or 3% of global cash flows. That would mean 1000 billion market cap for 1% of global money flows, 2000 billion market cap for 2% ... 3000 billion Marketcap for 3% of international money flows and so on. Inquire, do you really believe that crypto currencies will stop there? We are not even at the top of the first step of the stairs that leads to the future place of crypto currencies in the space of international monetary flows. This will only happen once in the history of humanity and for a minimum of risk for merchantss who will accept crypto currencies and especially NYC. Simply accept NYC on a small percentage of your cash flow. Do these French, Chinese, Americans who made a fortune by accepting and accumulating bitcoin up to just 5% of its money. Simple hairdresser, restaurateurs, grocers, small merchants…
With expensive product, make small reduction if customers just paid 1,2 or 3% in NYC. No risk and great deal
Opportunity to make a fortune with only 1 customer, like this French hairdresser who knew nothing in 2010 and made a fortune with a single customer to whom she made a small reduction if she paid in bitcoin, just to laugh, just for fun. In 2014, she traded some bitcoin to live as a senior executive and made a real fortune in 2017. Of course, she still has bitcoins well warm and 2 million € on his bank account. All this, without ever buying a single bitcoin, with never take a single risk, just to try and just for fun. Today, with NYC « the Bitcoin for New Yorkers » has fast and free transaction: It is possible to achieve the same feat without the NYC reaches $ 17,000 but only 0.01 or $ 0.10 or 1 $
Example of no risk for merchant: (You do what you want about the risk you want take and you touch people who wants buy cheap and you touch the crypto fan in your city, region and the all world please to the community(growing and growing) who make for you publicity everywhere in every supports that exist in this world !!! Articles, vidéos, photos, prices, websites, stickers, conversations, shares…)
Product A = 100$ in Fiat Same product = 90$ if paid 80% in fiat and 20% in NYC = 72$ + 64 285 NYC Same Product = 80$(or 85$ as you want, you choose) if paid 50% in fiat and 50% in Nyc = 40$ + 142 857 Nyc Minimum risk = Same product at 95$ if paid 90% in fiat and 10% NYC
Objectif owners in the next years: Accumulate : 100 millions NYC = 20 à 25000$ of sell to be millionnaire At NYC price= 0.01$. At one penny = millionnaire Marketcap NYC = 1 320 000 000$
Accumulate 10 millions NYC = 2800$ of sell to be millionnaire at NYC price = 0.10$ At 10 cents = millionnaire at 13 200 000 000 $ Marketcap
Accumulate 1 millions NYC = 280$ of sell to be millionnaire with NYC at 1$ etc…
The best advertisement of all time. The human advertising of a worldwide community that will prompt ordering in your shop. With articles, videos, reports on your store or service that you offer and you win returns in notoriety in your own neighborhood, city, region, country. We send you all these media as soon as you ask if you want to use it on your website, sign or other advertising medium. Or Here on Reddit : post « Merchants news, what we found about you all around the word »
Try to find small vidéos and small articles of owners who made a lot of money with bitcoin with minimum of risk without spend one $ in an exchange ;)
With stimulate merchants with ideas and With this « strategy with no risk » to give to the merchants we can proliferate NYC acceptance really easily. "A small reduction for customers who pay a small part of the price in NYC and we could touch a lot of owners : Target have to be « not just » merchants but
« in all strata of society. It could be the real power of NYC »
Owners of services : Marketing, e-merchants, every coach, independent of anything, human services(big potential here, people who haven’t not much money and there is a real hope for them and can give us examples to give the all word of people accept NYC in all strata of society and show our growing
maid, housekeeper, mason, housework, pet grooming, wellness, used car salesman, seller of anything...Every business man in every domain can see avantages to used NYC, not just pizza sellers or other..
Bars, discothèques, restaurants :
Tourist Shops : Cloths, apparel,
Services
Mp3 finished ;)
submitted by NewyorkCoinFrance to NewYorkCoin [link] [comments]

Of Wolves and Weasels - Day 109 - Weekly Wrapup #9

Hey all! GoodShibe here!
Here's your Weekly Wrap-up of what went on in the community this week.
Announcements
Best Memes/Pics of the Week
Businesses Accepting Dogecoin
Worth Reading
PodCasts
In the News
Did I miss something? I'm sure I did! Please let me know in the comments and I'll add it!
Also of note, I've seen almost no new Dogecoin businesses coming forward in the last week. Something worth mentioning!
It's 8:27AM EST and we're at 74.57% of DOGEs found. Our Global Hashrate is spiking from ~68 to 77 Gigahashes per second and our Difficulty is bouncing between ~964 and ~1305.
Get out there and mine, my friends! The Halvening part 2 happens tomorrow!
As always, I appreciate your support!
GoodShibe
submitted by GoodShibe to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Why Nyancoin will hit $1/NYAN (and much more). We're going to space, and you're invited!

As I grew up, I always seemed to be on the cusp of everything new, so trust me that I am no stranger to this game... I originally wrote this regarding Dogecoin, but my interests have shifted as of late. I am still a big fan, but my real passion as of late is its little cat sibling, Nyancoin. So I have rewritten this in regards to our new favorite crypto.
Understand, there is not just one 'tipping point' in an innovation, there are several and they are catalysts to each other. Nyancoin has reached it's first tipping point in the crypto-currency scene and I only see it appreciating in value once the price first stabilizes, now that we are on our first major exchange.
The possibilities for crypto-currency are numerous and with the government and big banks starting to recognize it for the first time (as evidenced by the success of bitcoin) we are on to a real revolution here.
Now here's the fun catch. Which was the first successful computer company? But who's the hottest today?
When we look at what makes a successful product, it's not just the technical merits that work. If it were, people wouldn't buy iPhones and iPads. Understand that we stand on the release of the first 'iPod' in the Crypto-currency world. That 'iPod' are the meme currencies which we are laughing at and playing with today.
Bitcoin is Pong. Dogecoin is Super Mario Brothers.

Nyancoin is Legend of Zelda.

Bitcoin is the first dice. Dogecoin is blackjack.

Nyancoin is a full fledged video-slot machine!

Do you see the role we fill!?
There were mp3 players before the iPod came out. But they were complicated, and scary! The techno-babble was impenetrable! But then that little device made mp3 players fun and friendly. It was simultaneously a status symbol and a thing that brought you joy just to own it.
Market psychology tells us people buy things for two reason: to show off to others and for the innate joy that comes from owning something. And if you can capture both?
Nyancoin stands on the brink of doing that. Cute and non-threatening but holding real value, and (this is the most critical aspect) allowing people to feel 'important'. Many posters have really hit the nail on the head: no one wants to own 0.02 Bitcoins... bleh. But Nyancoin's value is between 1 and 2 cents a coin (as of writing), and it's fun to own hundreds and even thousands of them.
We must continue to distribute and grow our fledgling currency. Tell people about it in a lighthearted and joking way. I am letting all my friends know: "Hey, you guys have heard of bitcoins right? What about Dogecoins? Well I'm into something even weirder! An animated cat coin!"
Our meme-currencies are destined for bigger things; please don't lose your faith! Nyancoin has a large marketspace to fill, and it's purrfectly positioned to do it.
I remember a couple of years ago when Bitcoin crashed from $10 a coin to $2, and everyone was laughing at the idiots who bought bitcoins... I remember when Dogecoin was at 30 satoshis and I was buying as much as I could (while people laughed at me for wasting my money). Nyancoin will have the last laugh (from the depths of space). It has all the market traits of a future successful product, I guarantee it. Even now my Wall Street friends are making fun of me and laughing it up. Here's a recent comment:

We are in the heart of earnings season. Every day, there are a thousand different ways to put your capital to work and make a small fortune in the stock market.

Instead, you are investing in joke internet coins based on "an animated cartoon cat with the body of a Pop-Tart, flying through space, and leaving a rainbow trail behind it." Let that sink in a little bit.

Let's show these people. Let's show them what we can do. Let's have the last laugh, from the depths of space itself. I thrive in the face of doubt and adversity; I have been doubted all my life, and I have never failed to make those same people eat mud.
The total market cap of Nyancoin is 337 million NYAN with every coin mined. So here's how much NYAN would have to be worth for each major magnitude change in US Dollars. Now bear in mind we are discussing total-cap, which is not the number that most websites report; most only report the current market cap which only takes into account the number of coins currently mined - I like to also consider what will happen when all coins are mined, which will happen around 2017:
But it will not get there if we do not spread Nyancoin selflessly! Currency only has value if people believe in it and it has utility. We need to get Nyan into as many hands as possible and work to make connections so people can spend it for a variety of goods and services. I want people spending Nyan for video games, toys, in-game items/currencies, beauty products, make-up, programming services, cat shelters, and more!
Of all the cryptos, this is the one that truly will sail through the stars. Much love to all of you,
We're going to space, and you're invited.
submitted by americanpegasus to nyancoins [link] [comments]

Why the Web Won't be Nirvana (circa 1995)

I just ran across Why the Web Won't be Nirvana, an article written by astronomehacker Cliff Stoll in 1995. In it, Cliff presents an argument against the vision of an Internet revolution:
Visionaries see a future of telecommuting workers, interactive libraries and multimedia classrooms. They speak of electronic town meetings and virtual communities. Commerce and business will shift from offices and malls to networks and modems. And the freedom of digital networks will make government more democratic.
Baloney. Do our computer pundits lack all common sense? The truth in no online database will replace your daily newspaper, no CD-ROM can take the place of a competent teacher and no computer network will change the way government works.
I thought it would be a fun exercise to step through Cliff's arguments and see how his predictions have panned out over the last 19 years.
1. Democratic speech 
Consider today's online world. The Usenet, a worldwide bulletin board, allows anyone to post messages across the nation. Your word gets out, leapfrogging editors and publishers. Every voice can be heard cheaply and instantly. The result? Every voice is heard. The cacophany more closely resembles citizens band radio, complete with handles, harrasment, and anonymous threats. When most everyone shouts, few listen.
The cacophony still exists. I immediately think of YouTube comments, XBox Live participants, and 4chan. However, the Internet has evolved methods to filter meaningful content from noise without the need for a central authority, like an editor or publisher. Blogs, Podcasts, and Web Video allow Internet users to create media content. Social networking services allow this content to be shared democratically and acts as a word of mouth filter. Additionally, sites like Reddit allow users to vote directly on content to directly determine what signals arise from the cacophony.
Still other sites like BuzzFeed aggregate content by applying the old-world publisher model to new-world viral content.
2. Electronic publishing 
How about electronic publishing? Try reading a book on disc. At best, it's an unpleasant chore: the myopic glow of a clunky computer replaces the friendly pages of a book. And you can't tote that laptop to the beach. Yet Nicholas Negroponte, director of the MIT Media Lab, predicts that we'll soon buy books and newspapers straight over the Intenet. Uh, sure.
This one is pretty funny :)
The problem here is that Cliff assumes computer hardware will not improve with time. The typical beach in 2014 is littered with computers: mp3 players, smartphones, and people with e-book readers relaxing on the shore.
3. Information retrieval 
What the Internet hucksters won't tell you is tht the Internet is one big ocean of unedited data, without any pretense of completeness. Lacking editors, reviewers or critics, the Internet has become a wasteland of unfiltered data. You don't know what to ignore and what's worth reading. Logged onto the World Wide Web, I hunt for the date of the Battle of Trafalgar. Hundreds of files show up, and it takes 15 minutes to unravel them—one's a biography written by an eighth grader, the second is a computer game that doesn't work and the third is an image of a London monument. None answers my question, and my search is periodically interrupted by messages like, "Too many connections, try again later."
This seems strange now that Google has become ubiquitous, but it shows just how vital an intelligent search algorithm is to the modern Internet. Also, a big shout-out to Wikipedia which uses a democratic system to create and regulate the largest general reference work of all time. Together, these two technologies form the perfect counter-argument to much of Cliff's article.
In 1995, Cliff's search for the date of the Battle of Trafalgar stalled out. In 2014, I pressed Ctl + T in my browser, typed Battle of Trafalgar, pressed enter, and Google retrieved the Battle's Wikipedia page in .27 seconds.
The date Cliff was looking for is October 21st, 1805.
4. Government campaigns 
Won't the Internet be useful in governing? Internet addicts clamor for government reports. But when Andy Spano ran for county executive in Westchester County, N.Y., he put every press release and position paper onto a bulletin board. In that affluent county, with plenty of computer companies, how many voters logged in? Fewer than 30. Not a good omen.
Ron Paul's 2008 campaign proved that the Internet can be a very powerful political weapon. The campaign was driven primarily by a grassroots movement that operated through newly established social media channels such as YouTube, MySpace, and Facebook. Though he lost the Republican primary, Paul lives on as an example of what an earnest community can accomplish with the Internet.
Also, as this meme.
5. Education 
Then there are those pushing computers into schools. We're told that multimedia will make schoolwork easy and fun. Students will happily learn from animated characters while taught by expertly tailored software.Who needs teachers when you've got computer-aided education? Bah. These expensive toys are difficult to use in classrooms and require extensive teacher training. Sure, kids love videogames—but think of your own experience: can you recall even one educational filmstrip of decades past? I'll bet you remember the two or three great teachers who made a difference in your life.
Google + Wikipedia can teach almost anything to anyone. As far as traditional book learning goes, the Khan Academy offers free online school tutorials and reaches 10,000,000 students per month. Sites like Udacity and Coursera offer free, highly-specialized, University level courses taught by world-class experts with active feedback from the teachers through discussion boards for free to anyone with an Internet connection.
The 1995 student may remember Mr. Jones who taught high-school physics, but the 2014 student can remember taking an AI class with Sebastian Thrun, the Stanford professor who invented the Google car.
6. Business 
Then there's cyberbusiness. We're promised instant catalog shopping—just point and click for great deals. We'll order airline tickets over the network, make restaurant reservations and negotiate sales contracts. Stores will become obselete. So how come my local mall does more business in an afternoon than the entire Internet handles in a month? Even if there were a trustworthy way to send money over the Internet—which there isn't—the network is missing a most essential ingredient of capitalism: salespeople.
You can buy nearly any product you want from Amazon and eBay. You can order anything from airline tickets, to hotel rooms, to food delivery from specialized websites that aggregate prices and automate coupons. Forbes recently ran an article about the shopping mall's impending death (I found the article by typing "Internet vs mall" into Google and read the article online for free).
Credit card information is sent over secure channels across the Internet every day. Services like PayPal allow a layer of abstraction between payments and bank accounts. Digital currency systems like Bitcoin are gaining popularity and attracting users.
7. Virtual space 
What's missing from this electronic wonderland? Human contact. Discount the fawning techno-burble about virtual communities. Computers and networks isolate us from one another. A network chat line is a limp substitute for meeting friends over coffee. No interactive multimedia display comes close to the excitement of a live concert. And who'd prefer cybersex to the real thing? While the Internet beckons brightly, seductively flashing an icon of knowledge-as-power, this nonplace lures us to surrender our time on earth. A poor substitute it is, this virtual reality where frustration is legion and where—in the holy names of Education and Progress—important aspects of human interactions are relentlessly devalued.
Already, we are shying away from direct contact with others at every opportunity. We prefer texting to calling, stare at our iPhones during concerts, and the Internet has made porn ubiquitous.
Furthermore, the next generation of technology is aimed to blur the line between physical and cyber spaces. Google Glass places the Internet's information perpetually in the visual field of its users. The Oculus Rift is taking life-like virtual reality out of the realm of science fiction and placing it onto the market. The Omni allows users to navigate an immersive 3D environment using their legs.
Sorry Cliff, it looks like you were wrong on all counts :P
submitted by mrwzrd to Futurology [link] [comments]

Interviews

2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
submitted by gazhere to Anamanaguchi [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: Charles Stross, science fiction writer

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-07-02
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Are you planning a kickstarter game like Neal Stephenson? If you did what would it be about? Reverse order: no, I'm not planning a kickstarter game. And I'm not really a game designer. (Writing novels takes up about 100% of my available working time.)
Fellow early adopter here. TI gave me a TIPC with a 1200 baud modem and sent me home. I tripped over the usenet and compuserve by accident. What happened to keep you off for 6 months?! Left university and got a job with a company who had no internet connection, back in the days when a 2400 baud UUCP dial-up cost £900 a year (or about a months' gross salary). Remedied this by changing jobs :)
Hallo Charles. I'm in the UK. I just wrote a book and (it looks like) a good publishing house are going to pick it up. It is sort of sci-fi. For starters, there's a long-standing (50 year old) flame war within the field over whether it's "sci-fi" or "SF".
My question: all agents I've spoken to think that while selling a book to publishers it's best to avoid using the term "sci-fi" if possible. Ideally they want to sneak sci-fi stuff in, "under the radar", so it can get the sort of backing that only a big publisher can provide. Secondly, all these labels boil down to is a bunch of marketing categories that tell bookshop staff where to file the product (which they don't know from a hole in the road) on the shelves where customers can find it. SF has traditionally been looked down on by the literary establishment because, to be honest, much early SF was execrably badly written -- but these days the significance of the pigeon hole is fading; we have serious mainstream authors writing stuff that is I-can't-believe-it's-not-SF, and SF authors breaking into the mainstream. If you view them as tags that point to shelves in bricks-and-mortar bookshops, how long are these genre categories going to survive in the age of the internet?
How do you feel about this? Cheers. Note: this skepticism breaks down in the face of, for example, the German publishing sector, where booksellers are a lot stuffier and more hidebound over what is or is not acceptable as literature.
Could you give an example or two of large British publishers that you think are doing a good job in this respect? Ignoring genre barriers, taking risks etc? AhahahaHA!!
Sorry, no I can't. But not for the reason you think. Thing is, my agent is based in New York. And due to a historic accident, my publishing track is primarily American -- I'm sold into the UK almost as a foreign import! So I'm quite out of touch with what's going on in UK publishing. (Even my Kindle is geared to the US store.)
Did you end up with an American agent because all the British agents passed on you? Or did you actually want to do things that way? A bit of both. I wanted an agent who would actually sell stuff. After two British agents failed comprehensively, I was reading Locus (the SF field's trade journal) and noticed a press release about an experienced editor leaving her job to join an agent in setting up a new agency. And I went "aha!" -- because what you need is an agent who knows the industry but who doesn't have a huge list of famous clients whose needs will inevitably be put ahead of you. So I emailed her, and ... well, 11 years later I am the client listed at the top of her masthead!
One last question (if you can be arsed). When you look at the publishing process (particularly the point at which agents have to sell books) what do you think needs to be fixed/tinkered with? Are editors too short-sighted? In your experience is their predilection for putting things in boxes limiting? Biggest message: find your customers and sell them what they want to buy. DRM is bad for business. Territorial rights restrictions are bad for business. Amazon are utterly hateful and evil -- they will kill you and establish a monopoly if they can -- but their one redeeming feature is that they're good to customers: so learn from them.
Basically if you could sit all the big editors down and briefly lecture them on doing their job what would you say? Thanks Charles. It's not the editors I'd lecture, but the senior executives who give the publishing CEOs their marching orders (editors are a level below that). All the editors I deal with are extremely smart, clueful folks who are often frustrated by corporate policies -- because the publishing houses are divisions within large media conglomerates, and they're small, low-profit subsidiaries at that (and so don't get much say in group-wide policy).
Have you considered selling books via Baen? They seem to have the right idea, and you're in the right genre. Link to www.baen.com. Not up to me, up to my publishers.
For someone who is unfamiliar with your work, what book would you suggest as a good starting point (if it's available for Kindle, I will get it as soon as I see your answer)? Any plans to follow in L. Ron's footsteps and start a religion? I'm an atheist (subtype: generally agree with Richard Dawkins but think he could be slightly more polite; special twist: I was raised in British reform Judaism, which is not like American reform Judaism, much less any other strain of organised religion). So: no cults here. Starting points: for a sampler, you could try my short story collection "Wireless". Which contains one novella that scooped a Locus award, and one that won a Hugo, and covers a range of different styles.
Thank you so much for releasing Accelerando as a freebie! I'd just picked up Stanza on my iPhone and was going through the free Sci Fi (or SF) books. That ebook got me hooked, so was a pretty savvy marketing move. Book depository is nothing new; there've been outlets selling books internationally via mail order for many decades -- the only change is that it's now easier to find and use such services.
So, is there an official term for "Polite Atheist"? Someone who doesn't believe, yet isn't offensive about it? I'm not sure. The trouble is, if you go too far towards being polite, the label that applies is "doormat".
Hi! Would you consider Halting State and Rule 34 Cyberpunk? I was heavily reminded of Neal Stephensons early books (the craziness of Snow Crash mixed with more current-day themes like Cryptonomicon). "Halting State" and "Rule 34" are cyberpunk only insofar as we are living in a 1980s cyberpunk dystopia, and these are very much novels of our time (plus 10-20 years). What I've learned during my life is that the near future is 90% identical to the present -- if you buy a new car today, it'll probably still be on the road in 2022. Another 9% is predictable from existing tech roadmaps: Intel's projected roadmap for where their processors are going, SpaceX's order book for satellite launches, and so on. And 1% is totally bugfuck crazy and impossible to predict. (Go back to 1982 and the idea that the USSR would have collapsed and been replaced by hyper-capitalist oligarchs would have earned you a straitjacket, never mind a book contract. Go back to 1992 and the idea that the USA and Iran would be fighting a proxy war on the internet would have ... well, ditto.)
While I love the Laundry books I consider A Colder War one of your best works, is there a chance that we will get another 'serious' story with Lovecraftian themes? Lovecraftian seriousness: well, book 5 or 6 of the Laundry series is due to get epically grim.
Case Nightmare Green? Yup.
It's always interesting to learn how different authors approach their craft. What's your "ritual" when writing? TL;DR: I don't have one.
Longer version ... (I want to apologize for keeping this short: I have carpal tunnel issues so I might have to switch to speech recognition soon) ...
I write exclusively using computers. Pens and typewriters can fsck right off -- I wrote my first half million words in my teens on a manual typewriter (had to trade it for a new one due to keys snapping from metal fatigue) so I am not a pen or typewriter fetishist.
I write almost entlirely on Macs, because: Windows gives me hives. (I first ran into Windows as of Win 2.11/386, back in the eighties. It did not leave a good taste. I then became a happy UNIX bunny. Mac OSX is the last UNIX workstation class OS standing. So I've learned to put up with its other foibles.)
I have no set writing routine other than: plant bum in chair in front of keyboard/on sofa under laptop, and start going. Oh, and I drink tea pretty much continuously at a rate of around 1 imperial pint/hour, which sort of enforces screen/keyboard breaks.
(I want to apologize for keeping this short: I have carpal tunnel issues so I might have to switch to speech recognition soon) I write exclusively using computers. Does this mean you use speech recognition while writing too? or have you been writing before the AMA and you're at your fatigue point? Speech recognition is utterly crap for writing fiction. If you try reading a novel aloud you'll soon figure out why -- written prose style is utterly unlike the spoken word.
Why Mac rather than Linux? (Esp. considering your background, e.g. Computer Shopper etc.) Excellent design values. ("Why drive a Porsche if you could drive a backhoe? The backhoe's got more torque and you can do cool things with it like digging holes in the road!" "Yes, but the backhoe isn't a Porsche ...")
It gets out of my way and lets me get stuff done. Seriously, Windows seems designed to make easy tasks hard and hard tasks impossible; Linux would be fine if it came pre-tuned to the hardware, but I've got a long term 30% failure rate getting any given laptop to run it properly with full device support -- I can do without the choice between badly designed, bulky, inconvenient machines that work with Linux, and taking pot luck that the latest well-designed sleek ultrabook will actually, um, boot.
TL:DR; I've reached an age at which I'd rather pay more for something that "just works" than roll up my sleeves, reach for a spanner, and make it work. Time is money, and the older we get the less of it we've got left ...
It's said that people have to write a million words of crap before they can rite good stuff. True, in your opinion? No. I wrote two million words of crap. Maybe I'm just a slow learner ...
Do you just put up with the carpal tunnel when writing? Up to a point. I don't want to permanently damage myself! On the other hand, a couple of days off the keyboard tends to make things somewhat better.
What are your views about people pirating your books? Back before the internet we had a name for people who bought a single copy of our books and lent them to all their friends without charging: we called them "librarians". Frankly, I couldn't care less about you loaning a copy of one of my books, on paper, to a friend. In fact, I think it's a good idea. Spreads the word, right? What I do have a problem with is people who sell my work for financial gain without paying me a cut of the proceeds. If money is passing hands, then the customer feels that they've paid for the right to read the work. But if they haven't paid me (or my publishers), then that's siphoning money out of my income stream. Today, we see some "file sharing" sites that rely on fans uploading cracked copies of ebooks, and which then make money off those books by charging for downloads (via cash subscriptions or advertising). Again: I take a dim view of this. They're making money off the back of my work without paying me.
2: Mr. Stross answered this question in far more detail while I was typing the above edit. Thank you! [Edit/afterthought] More often than not, piracy is a symptom of an under-provisioned market. People want to buy mp3s but can't? Piracy ensues. Then Apple strong-arms the music studios into the iTunes store and music piracy drops somewhat. The same, I believe, is also happening with ebooks.
Do you make a point of turning unpromising-sounding premises into something really extra-ordinary? Or are the back-of-book blurbs just over-simplifying? The back-of-book blurb is not written by the author (any more than the author paints the cover illustration). The sole job of the back-of-book blurb and the cover is to make a reader who is unfamiliar with the author or the book pick the product up in a store, because retail psychology studies show that consumers who handle the merchandise are more likely to buy it.
Hi Charlie! I've read much of what you've written, and I just have to say that you have a creativity rarely matched in SF - please keep it up. That said, what gadget do you think is going to have the greatest impact on the way we live in the next few coming years? Something like the Google glasses? Ultra-low power consumption ubiquitous embedded processors powered by ambient light or EM radiation are going to do insane things to our cities in the next 15-30 years -- far more significant than google glasses, which are just a slightly different UI (you can do much the same stuff already using a smartphone with motion/orientation/positioning sensors) ...
The radical transparency surveillance state that Brin predicted, open to all? Or data inequality leveraged by the HFT engines of the rich corporations to give them the edge to make a buck of it? Now add ambient genome sensing -- not human genomes, but the microbiome soup we live in (remember, sequencer costs are currently obeying Moore's Law) and start wondering where it's all going!
Been a fan for a long time. Got hooked via Accelerando (which I understand is something of an old shame at this point?), and stayed hooked via Halting State and the Laundry Files. Thanks for the AMA. :D. It's not an old shame, it's simply that I wrote it circa 1998-2004, and my views have changed somewhat over the intervening decade ...
Can you please expand on that? In what way did your views change? Accelerando is one of my all time favourites. Sure. See: Link to www.antipope.org
Link to www.amazon.com
Progress always get met with "but consider the ethics..". OK, let me ask you this: if you have a no-shit AI in a box, and it's running, when you switch it off/reboot it/reformat it/send it to the scrap heap, are you murdering a sentient being? Yes/No? Please justify your reasoning.
Now consider: your no-shit AI is the adversary in a computer game environment. What happens when you kill it (in-game)? What happens when you get tired of the game and delete it?
Hint: some fun background reading would be Ted Chiang's "The Lifecycle of Software Objects".
Have you ever used unused (or used) ideas from your D&D days in your stories, or vice versa? No. My D&D days are 30 years gone; it'd be a rare idea to survive from that long ago.
If you could meet any dead science fiction author for a day, who would you meet and what would you do? Roger Zelazny. And probably a pub crawl then a curry.
How hard was it for you to break into the US market? If I'd known how easy it would be, I'd have done it earlier!
If you could choose between The Merchant Princes becoming a video game, a movie series, a TV series, and a limited HBO TV series, what format would you choose? Who would you pick for a director and some of the leads? Would you want to do the screenplay yourself? None of those are media formats I consume, so I have no opinion on the options. (Nor do I have any idea who the currently interesting directors or actors are.) If I wanted to be in movies, I'd have gone into scriptwriting: the fact that I write novels should be a big hint about what I prefer to do!
(Final Q: I dislike Dr Who and Star Trek, so I shan't comment further.)
"I dislike Dr. Who and Star Trek..." This is like finding out your dad really can't beat up everyone else's dad. They've achieved cult following through character development, but as SF they both have gigantic structural flaws at the plot and tech level; great gaping internal inconsistencies! (Although I'm kind of fond of the meta-theory that explains Star Trek as being propaganda intended for external consumption by the Federation, which is actually the Soviet Union in Space in the 24th century.)
Next you will tell me Nutella doesn't really taste good. Damn you Charles Stross! Damn you to hell! I will still read your books, but I will do so with a smug expression of annoyance ;) Nutella is okay, but Marmite rocks as a sandwich topping!
You must try Vegemite. I like vegemite too.
(Alas - this may be TMI - I have a mild yeast intolerance; if I consume too much wheat beer or marmite or vegemite and my next morning will be exceedingly interesting, in a most unpleasant way.)
I saw that you started writing at the age of 15, novels at that. I'm a younger person myself, and for me and the rest of novel-aspiring-youth, what do you have to tell? Tips, motivation, etc.? Write. Every day, if possible.
Finish stuff.
Send it out, and when it comes back, send it out again.
Step 3 may be a bit premature if you're thinking about professional publication, but at the very least: workshop with other writers, learn to critique their work, learn to understand and listen to their criticism of your work, then apply the skills you learned dissecting other folks' writing to your own stuff.
Do you ever read something someone else has written and think "damn, now I cant do that". Who do you read? (if you have time) Yes, I sometimes get the "Damn, too late, [X] got there first" idea. But seriously? I have time to write 1-2 novels per year, and get roughly novel-sized ideas every month. I have to perform triage on my own writing impulses. So it's usually quite easy to shrug and write something else instead.
What I read: while I'm writing, I tend to go off reading fiction for relaxation -- especially the challenging stuff. It's too much like the day job. When I do get to chow down on a book, I try to read ones that are nothing like what I'm writing. So, as I'm currently working on a space opera (of sorts) I'm mostly indulging in urban fantasy.
Wow, I didn't realise the ideas flew in so fast. Is it morbid to ask if you worry about getting it all written before you die? (Im thinking of Terry Pratchett here...) Yes, I worry about that. I'm 47. I reckon I can count on 30 more writing years, averaging a book a year (I can't keep up the 2-2.5 a year I used to do these days). And these days I've gotten round to wondering, for each new idea, "do I want to be remembered for this?" before I get to the point of spending a year on it.
Asimov or Clarke? Neither, although I'm marginally less averse to Clarke's style.
Out of curiosity, what about Heinlein? (As a writer, at least - let's leave politics aside for the moment.) I have written a Heinlein tribute novel.
In general, who in sci-fi/SF inspired you, and/or inspires you now? (Unfortunately, while most authors who do that -- Scalzi, Varley, Robinson, et al -- pick Heinlein juveniles, I went for a dirty old man Heinlein tribute novel. Hence "Saturn's Children" and a novel that hinges on the word spung!).
Have you ever been afraid to actually publish a book for fear of what your fans may think? And how do you deal with writers block, or just actually getting the damn thing started? And lastly, do you read books that aren't in your current genre? And if so, what's your favorite? Publishing is the final step in making a book; if I was afraid to publish one, I wouldn't write it in the first place. (But in general, a little controversy isn't harmful: if anything, it gets people interested. I don't think most of my opinions, political or social, are so far outside of the mainstream that they'd cause massive outrage on a scale liable to provoke death threats or referrals to prosecutors for outraging public decency, so why worry?)
Writers block: when I get it, it's because my subconscious spotted that I'd make a huge structural mistake in constructing a novel before my conscious mind became aware of it, and threw on the brakes. So I've learned not to sweat it: take two days off, then back up a chapter, read through, and try to work out why I'm suddenly uneasy about continuing.
While writing a novel I almost completely stop reading books in the same sub-genre for the duration.
Hi there, funnily enough i just finished the Atrocity Archives, which i bought because i bought the Laundry RPG a while back. Awesome book. Loved it. Can't wait to run the game. So do you play Call of Cthulhu or the Laundry at all? Or are you just into the writing side? Strictly writing side. I was heavily into AD&D in my teens (late 1970s-early 1980s) but fell off the RPG habit in the mid-80s and have never gone back to it; my lifestyle today isn't very compatible with having a regular gaming group (too much travel).
Which do you enjoy writing more; the Laundry series or harder scifi like Glasshouse and Accelerando? That's a very hard question.
If I write too much of anything for too long, I burn out on it. So it helps to vary my output from year to year. That's partly why the Laundry books are coming out at 2-5 year intervals rather than every 12 months.
As someone who grew up reading Ian Fleming and HP Lovecraft, I think they're well worth the wait! (Just pre-ordered the latest iteration) Also, do you find it difficult to write your more abstract stories like Accelerando? I tried to explain it to a friend once, but failed miserably. Accelerando was murder. It took me more than five years, in the shape of nine stories. One of which (#5) was so difficult that by way of finding an excuse to dodge having to work on it I accidentally barfed up the first two volumes of the Merchant Princes series.
I am a huge fan of yours. Three of my favorite short stories are Missile Gap, A Colder War, and Unwirer. Well, I guess I just really love the whole "Wireless" collection. What inspired you to cross Lovecraft with The Cold War? Fear of nuclear annihilation. I'm a child of the cold war: I didn't live more than 10 miles from a major WarPac nuclear target until the Berlin Wall came down and the CW ended. Knowing you can die horribly at any moment because of decisions made by alien intelligences thousands of miles away who don't even know you exist -- there's something Lovecraftian about that, isn't there?
At what age did you start writing novels? I began my first novel when I was 15. It went through three drafts, of around 40,000 words each. If I find it, I'll burn it. (If you read it, you'd thank me :)
Hahahha I'm 15 now. Every time when i have to do an assignment for school, i don't really know how to start, could you give me some advice, please? Nope. Because I'm nearly a third of a century older than you, and any advice I could give you about school assignments would be slightly out of date ...!
The modern solution is to just wikiwalk until inspired. Or tropeswalk! Actually, no, don't do that. You'll get sucked into TVTropes and suddenly notice that the sun's peeking through your window, you're knee-deep in villain archetypes, and the assignment's due in three hours. Your warning comes too late. Actually, I was semi-immunized to TVTropes by being sent a copy of the Turkey City Lexicon by Bruce Sterling at an impressionable age: Link to www.sfwa.org
What do you think of TV Tropes, in general? Like all good things, it's possible to overdose on it.
But for someone who is starting out on developing their critical skills, just being aware of its existence is great: it can make the difference between trying to write a story around a cliche or an original idea, and better still, studying it can eventually clue you in on how to breathe new life into tired tropes.
One of the things that I liked about Halting State and Rule 34 was that they are set in a plausible near future where technology has made individuals much more productive than people from 50+ years ago. Given that with technological assistance one worker can now supervise many machines working to produce goods do you think that there will be a resurgence of a leisure class in the first world? Do you think that we are getting to the point where instead of overpaying people to do manual factory work there is room for another model that still resembles modern life? I have no answer to this question. Keynes asked it more than fifty years ago; something has clearly gone wrong, given that the folks with jobs seem to work endless hours while many people can't get a job at all.
Nice to see a bit of social marketing, it will be interesting to hear how it compares to the publishers' marketdroid efforts in terms of sales (if you can tease out the stats). Now the important question, favourite beer? My regular session beer is Deuchars IPA (Link to www.caledonianbeer.com) It's not an American-style bitterness wars IPA; it's a light, Scottish ale with just enough hops to tell you what it is, and it's weak enough that you can keep drinking it continuously for hours without any risk of waking up in a puddle with KICK ME tattooed on your bum.
Any other writing aids? Link to www.antipope.org
What's your policy/opinion on adverbs? I ask because guys like Stephen King encourage writers to murder every adverb before it ever hits the page, whereas guys like William Gibson (my favorite author) use them liberally. I have no policy, for or against: only a personal style. (Which is to say, I use them when I think it's appropriate to; for example, an internal monologue by a locquacious and verbose narrator is more likely to be larded with adverbs than an exchange of instant messages between cops at a crime scene.)
I'm a new but big fan. The first book of yours that I read only a few months ago was Accelerando and it absolutely blew my mind! Not only that but it made me very excited for the near future, I see Google Glasses as being a very exciting tech that leads into your vision. Bitcoin: probably not, but it's intriguing enough to be at the root of an entire interstellar finance system in "Neptune's Brood" (due next July, 2013).
PS I'm really looking forward to seeing you when you come to Perth West Aus next year. Maybe I can buy you a beer! Perth, beer? Sure!
Bitcoins as... urrrrgh. Okay. I'll have to read that, then. Hope you got the failure conditions right! I hybridised it with Chaum's digicash. With the added twist that participants in exchanges had to be in different solar systems. It's called "slow money" for a reason ...
How do you make sure you aren't "inadvertently plagiarizing?" I think up ideas a lot but am sure they have already been done somewhere or that I am ripping something off I have read and cannot recall specifically. Original creativity seems difficult. First: plagiarism requires you to copy someone else's words. You can avoid this by, er, not copying! Writing your own story around the same ideas is not plagiarism; at worst, it's being unoriginal.
thanks for the books...I love science fiction and appreciate the work that goes into putting out novels to entertain us. Having said that, you're right: coming up with truly new ideas is hard. But I've got a method: I look for a couple of obvious ideas that have been done before (try: folks who can travel at will to parallel universes; in their home world they're the aristocracy, because: magic powers) and then look for the second-order side effects: stuff that other authors didn't dig into (for example: wrt. the previous idea, what are the consequences of these folks' ability for the ongoing economic and political development of their world? Can it have negative consequences? If so, what are they?)
How long did it take you to become comfortable writing in the second person? I finished reading Rule 34 and it was the first novel* i had read in this style. It took me about a hundred pages of "Halting State" to get the hang of it, and another hundred pages to feel comfortable. I also needed a reason to start doing it (2nd person is the natural voice of the text adventure game -- "you are in a maze of twisty passages, all alike").
A trilogy? Does this mean that a third book is on contract, or that you just have it kicking around in your head? EDIT: Nevermind, you answered this already. Looking forward to it! "The Lambda Functionary" is on contract for delivery on July 1st, 2013 and publication around July 3rd, 2014. And I haven't even begun writing it yet. Ulp.
Connected intelligence (as in, human intelligence augmented by online sources) seems to be on the perpetual 'five years out' list - do you think projects like Google Glass will finally make this a reality? What sort of timescale would you envisage for mass-adoption? (crosses fingures for a 'yes') Hmm ... what's wrong with a smartphone with always-on 3G or 4G data and google/wikipedia? Doesn't that qualify?
How much pre-planning would you say that you do before starting on a new book? Or do you subscribe more to the "Let's just start writing and see where it takes us" camp? Both :)
No two books come out the same way. Some I write by the seat of my pants; others are planned in minute detail.
The one thing that does happen, every time, though, is that I never get to write a book until I've already been thinking about it for a period of months to years. Unless it's "Glasshouse" (time from initial idea to starting writing: 9 days).
Rule 34 was one of my favorite reads last year, but I found the title to be a bit of a red herring since (without spoilers) neither memes nor porn ended being a big part of the story's resolution (other than the department Kavanaugh is in when she started). Was that intentional? What is ATHENA if not a meme with legs? (The relative lack of porn I'll grant you ...) Link to www.antipope.org
Hi Charles, I'm Chinese and I live in Asia and most of the sci fi actually comes from the west. Is this due to cultural reasons, literacy or how technology/future seems to resonate more if written from a western perspective? Also, how can one become a successful sci fi/fantasy writer outside of Europe/America? I have no idea, frankly ...
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